from Breakingviews:

Murdochs’ UK political friendships backfire on all

April 24, 2012

By Chris Hughes 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from The Great Debate:

Murdoch’s tweets can’t save his tottering empire

By Nicholas Wapshott
April 3, 2012

On the night Queen Elizabeth scampered back from her Scottish castle to address an angry crowd outside Buckingham Palace – the crowd protesting she hadn’t paid enough respect to the memory of Princess Diana, killed in a car crash the week before – Rupert Murdoch was in the newsroom of the London Times. “There’s your headline,” he told the editor in charge. “Queen Saves Neck!” It was a perfect tabloid headline for a perfect tabloid story.

from MediaFile:

Content everywhere? More like content nowhere

March 2, 2012

Will Big Media and Big Tech companies ever stop punishing their biggest fans?

Like many people, I woke up yesterday and reached for my iPad for my morning hit of news, entertainment and information, so I could start my day. (And like many, I’m embarrassed to admit it.) Padding to the front door to get a newspaper still sounds more respectable, but my iPad gives me a far more current, rich and satisfying media experience than a still-warm printed Times could ever produce.

from Alison Frankel:

News Corp and the FCPA paradox

By Alison Frankel
February 28, 2012

For the Justice Department's Foreign Corrupt Practices prosecutors, last week was the best of times and the worst of times. A federal judge in Houston sentenced the former CEO of the Halliburton spin-off KBR Inc. to 30 months in prison for his role in a 10-year scheme to pay $182 million in bribes to Nigerian officials in order to secure $6 billion in military oil and gas contracts. Albert Stanley's sentencing marked the end of one of the DOJ's most successful FCPA prosecutions, in which KBR agreed to pay $579 million in criminal fines and disgorged profits -- the second-highest fine in an FCPA case at the time the guilty plea and Securities and Exchange Commission settlement was announced in 2009. The KBR case is an FCPA paradigm, a classic demonstration of the law's power to expose and punish corruption that would otherwise have stayed in the shadows.

from MediaFile:

Cage, Witherspoon feature in box-office battle

February 17, 2012

Three new movies compete for filmgoers over the long President's Day weekend in the United States. Nicolas Cage is expected to lead the pack of newcomers with Sony's 3D action sequel "Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance."

from MediaFile:

How long can Murdoch keep it up on Twitter?

January 3, 2012

You can say what you like about Rupert Murdoch, and most people have, but he doesn't do things halfway. His decision to join Twitter on New Year's eve has set the Twitterati and blogosphere alight not just because the 80-year old media baron joined but because unlike every other CEO or executive who's joined Twitter, he's actually expressed some real opinions -- some of which are controversial given who he is. When Reuters asked CEOs at its Global Media Summit last fall most felt tweeting wasn't for them.

from MediaFile:

Rupert Murdoch sells A shares, but still in control

November 21, 2011

Rupert Murdoch (Photo: Reuters)

News Corp  Chief Executive and Chairman Rupert Murdoch sold off the bulk of his common shareholding according to a regulatory filing but, have no fear the 80 year-old mogul is still very much in charge both in terms of management and financial control.

from MediaFile:

Murdoch backs progressive U.S. immigration policy

November 17, 2011

News Corp Chief Executive Rupert Murdoch on Thursday said the United States should work harder at making itself a more attractive country for people to emigrate to, as an important route back to enabling economic growth.
Murdoch, 80, who was born in Melbourne, Australia, became a naturalized a U.S. citizen in 1985.

from Breakingviews:

Rupert Murdoch’s sham governance on full display

October 25, 2011

By Jeffrey Goldfarb
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Jack Shafer:

Intrigue in the house of Murdoch

By Jack Shafer
October 19, 2011

New York Times reporter Jeremy W. Peters invests 2,400 words today in a Page One story delineating the "rift" between News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch and his son and heir apparent, News Corp. Chief Operating Officer James Murdoch.