from John Lloyd:

Here’s who should be watching the watchers

By John Lloyd
July 9, 2014

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The files stolen from the National Security Agency by Edward Snowden, the quiet American who has turned the security world inside out, drip out week by week – in The Guardian, on the new website The Intercept, financed by eBay founder Pierre Omidyar, in the German weekly Spiegel and in the Washington Post. The last of these outlets had the latest installment on Monday. It told us that “ordinary Internet users, American and non-American alike” had been swept into the NSA’s computers in far greater numbers than foreigners reasonably suspected of possible terrorist links.

from The Great Debate:

Don’t let data protection turn into protectionism

By Jim Hagemann Snabe
January 9, 2014

We live in a global, digitally networked world. Cloud, mobile and in-memory technologies are its engines. Our new world has no boundaries; there is a huge potential for growth, employment and new business models. But it also comes with challenges for policy and industry.

from The Great Debate:

Broaden the German-U.S. dialogue about snooping

By Jane Harman and Volker Perthes
November 21, 2013

Germans are not naive: They know that states spy, and that attempts to listen in to Chancellor Angela Merkel's conversations were to be expected. But they didn’t expect that the United States would do this, for a decade.

from Ian Bremmer:

An optimist’s view of the White House

By Ian Bremmer
November 8, 2013

What will the White House screw up next? Democrats have watched as one calamity after another has befallen what was once the most promising Democratic administration since John F. Kennedy’s. Obamacare, the NSA, Syria, heck, even the administration’s campaign foibles are back in the news with the publication of the new tell-all book Double Down.

from Mark Leonard:

The NSA and the weakness of American power

By Mark Leonard
October 31, 2013

The NSA scandal over phone tapping in Europe will soon blow over, conventional wisdom says. Jack Shafer has argued that, although allied leaders such as Angela Merkel are upset, they will (and have to) get over it.

from Jack Shafer:

Yes, we spy on allies. Want to make something of it?

By Jack Shafer
October 28, 2013

If not yet the consensus opinion, by tomorrow morning most everyone with a keyboard and a connection to the Internet who isn't also a head of state will concede that the ally-on-ally spying by the United States -- revealed in documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden to Der Spiegel -- won't matter much in the long run.

from MacroScope:

Trust me, I’m with Google

September 11, 2013

Hal Varian, Google’s chief economist, is unsurprisingly an advocate of data extraction and analysis on a mass scale – you’d almost have to be, as data-cruncher-in-chief of a company whose search engine was tapped a billion times just since this morning.

from Jack Shafer:

The NSA never takes “no” for an answer

By Jack Shafer
September 6, 2013

At several recent junctures, the U.S. government has publicly sought to expand its power and control over the electronic privacy of its citizens. At each point, the government was roundly foiled by the public and the majority of the political class, which rebuked it. But that has evidently never stopped the government from imposing its will surreptitiously. As the reporting of the New York TimesProPublica, and the Guardian about the National Security Agency's programs exposed by Edward Snowden showed once again yesterday, when the government really wants something, it can be temporarily denied but rarely foiled.

from Jack Shafer:

How to leak and not get caught

By Jack Shafer
July 9, 2013

If U.S. prosecutors ever get their hands on Edward Snowden, they'll play such a tympanic symphony on his skull he'll wish his hands never touched a computer keyboard. Should U.S. prosecutors fail, U.S. diplomats will squeeze -- as they did in Hong Kong -- until he squirts from his hiding place and scurries away in search of a new sanctuary. But even if he finds asylum in a friendly nation, his reservation will last only as long as a sympathetic regime is calling the shots. Whether he ends up in Venezuela or some other country that enjoys needling the United States, he'll forever be one election or one coup away from extradition.

from Photographers' Blog:

Where in Hong Kong is Mr. Snowden?

June 19, 2013

Hong Kong

By Bobby Yip

Hong Kong became the focus of the world's media this week after Edward Snowden, a former contractor at the National Security Agency (NSA) who leaked classified NSA information, gave The Guardian newspaper an exclusive interview and then went to ground somewhere in the financial hub - a town more used to a focus on money-making matters.