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from The Great Debate UK:

The missing debate about nuclear security

--Behnam Taebi is Assistant Professor of Philosophy, specialising in nuclear issues, at Delft University of Technology. The opinions expressed are his own.--

Technicians work at a uranium processing site in Isfahan 340 km (211 miles) south of the Iranian capital Tehran March 30, 2005. REUTERS/Raheb Homavandi

Today and tomorrow, the Netherlands will host the third Nuclear Security Summit (NSS), but while more than 50 world leaders converge on The Hague to focus on enhancing security of the stockpiles of nuclear materials and nuclear facilities across the world, key elements of the debate on nuclear security will be missing.

As a conference organised by Delft University last weekend on nuclear security, policy and ethics highlighted, a fully comprehensive agenda for the Hague sessions would also include socio-technical and ethical aspects of nuclear security, including nuclear disarmament and expansion of nuclear energy.

from The Great Debate:

Danger and delay on dirty bombs

When highly radioactive material that can be used in a “dirty bomb” is moved to or from a hospital in New York City, it is done in the dead of night on cordoned streets with high security.

In Mexico two weeks ago, a truck moving a large canister containing radioactive material was hijacked at a gas station -- where it had been parked with no security. The cobalt-60 that was stolen from the vehicle and then extracted from its protective lead shield is so potent that it is considered a significant national security threat under U.S. guidelines.

from Tales from the Trail:

Security summit honors Polish leaders who died in plane crash

NUCLEAR-SUMMIT/

Dozens of world leaders stood and bowed their heads in a moment of silence honoring Polish President Lech Kaczynski and nearly 100 others who died on Saturday in a plane crash in western Russia. U.S. President Barack Obama remembered the deaths as losses not just for their own country, "a close friend and ally," but for the world, before making remarks formally opening a gathering of world leaders to discuss nuclear security issues.

"Before I begin, I want to take this moment once again to acknowledge the terrible tragedy that struck the Polish people this weekend. All of us were shocked and deeply saddened by the devastating loss of President Kaczynski, the first lady and so many distinguished civilian and military leaders from your country. This was a loss not just for Poland but for the world," Obama said.

from Tales from the Trail:

How to ease traffic tie-ups in Washington: hold a nuclear security summit

There's nuclear security, and then there's street security. NUCLEAR-SUMMIT/OBAMA

High-level delegations from nearly 50 countries gathered in Washington to talk, talk, talk, and talk some more about keeping the world safe from nuclear terrorism at the Nuclear Security Summit hosted by President Barack Obama.

That in turn required Washington to cope with ensuring the safety of the world leaders gathered to mull world security.

from The Great Debate UK:

Breaking the deadlock on nuclear disarmament

John Duncan - John Duncan is the United Kingdom Ambassador for Multilateral Arms Control and Disarmament. He comments regularly via Twitter and on his own Blog. The opinions expressed are his own. -

Nuclear disarmament has been rather knocked out of the foreign affairs headlines over recent weeks by more immediate concerns over potential pandemics, the Indian election and the endgame of the long running conflict in Sri Lanka. But last week while the world’s media were looking elsewhere the international arms control and disarmament community took a remarkable step to break what has been called the “Decade of Deadlock”.

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