from The Great Debate:

Iran nuclear deal: Why the private sector will decide whether it survives

By Nate Olson
July 15, 2015

A man adjusts signs during the 15th International Oil and Gas Conference  in Tehran

A man adjusts signs during the 15th International Oil and Gas Conference in Tehran, November 1, 2011. REUTERS/Caren Firouz ​

from The Great Debate:

The only safe way to make a nuclear deal with Iran

By Elizabeth Rosenberg and Peter Harrell
July 6, 2015

U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and U.S. Under Secretary for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman meet with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif at a hotel in Vienna

Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, Secretary of State John Kerry and Under Secretary for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman (L-3rd L) meet with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif (2nd R) at a hotel in Vienna, Austria, June 28, 2015. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

from The Great Debate:

Options for the U.S. if Iran breaks a nuclear deal

By Bennett Ramberg
April 1, 2015

lbj & mac President Lyndon B. Johnson and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara in the White House in Washington, July, 27, 1965. LBJ Presidential Library/Yoichi Okamoto

The success of any nuclear framework agreement negotiated by Iran and the P5+1 (United States, Britain, Russia, Germany, France and China) this week ultimately will be determined not by the signing of a final accord in June but by Tehran’s fidelity to nonproliferation in the years and decades to come.

from The Great Debate:

Get over it: There’s no better deal coming on Iran’s nuclear program

By Paul R. Pillar
February 25, 2015

Officials sit around the negotiations table during their meeting in Vienna

Delegations of Secretary of State John Kerry, Britain's Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif, German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, EU High Representative Catherine Ashton, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi at a meeting in Vienna, November 24, 2014. REUTERS/Joe Klamar/Pool

from The Great Debate:

Iran is using Israel to distract from its real aims in the Persian Gulf

By Anthony H. Cordesman
February 5, 2015

A member of Iran's Revolutionary guard stands at attention during an anti-U.S. ceremony in Azadi (freedom) Square in Tehran April 25, 2010. REUTERS/Morteza Nikoubazl

A member of Iran's Revolutionary guard stands at attention during an anti-U.S. ceremony in Azadi (freedom) Square in Tehran April 25, 2010. REUTERS/Morteza Nikoubazl

from The Great Debate:

The IAEA can’t guarantee any nuclear program is peaceful

By Yousaf Butt
January 8, 2015

An Iranian operator monitors the nuclear power plant unit in Bushehr

Having failed to reach an agreement on a comprehensive nuclear accord in November, Tehran and the six world powers set a new deadline -- July 1, 2015. The diplomats are to meet again on Jan. 18, though prospects for a rapid breakthrough remain thin. One big roadblock is that the International Atomic Energy Agency has set for itself the impossible goal of verifying the “purely peaceful” nature of Iran's nuclear program.

from The Great Debate:

A misconception that could scuttle nuclear talks with Iran

By Jim Walsh and Aron Bernstein
November 24, 2014

EU envoy Ashton, Britain's Foreign Secretary Hammond and Iranian Foreign Minister Zarif sit at a table during talks in Vienna

As nuclear talks between Iran and the other members of the so-called P5+1 group are extended for another seven months, one issue is sure to remain a sticking point. The most important differences between all sides relates to the size of Iran’s uranium-enrichment program.

from The Great Debate:

Getting to ‘yes’ on the Iran nuclear deal

By Greg Thielmann
July 16, 2014

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif addresses the media during a news conference in Vienna

Iran’s past nuclear efforts are among the many thorny issues in the continuing Iran nuclear talks. But focusing on the past is a mistake. Instead of insisting on knowing all about what Iran’s nuclear program looked like 10 years ago, the United States and its allies should focus on preventing Tehran from building a nuclear weapon in the future.

from The Great Debate UK:

The missing debate about nuclear security

By Guest Contributor
March 24, 2014

--Behnam Taebi is Assistant Professor of Philosophy, specialising in nuclear issues, at Delft University of Technology. The opinions expressed are his own.--

from The Great Debate:

Nuclear terrorism prevention at a crossroads

By Kenneth N. Luongo and Kenneth C. Brill
March 24, 2014

The crisis in Ukraine underscores the prescience of the international efforts to eliminate all nuclear weapons and weapon-grade material there after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Their success lowered the danger of deadly nuclear assets falling into the wrong hands.