from The Great Debate:

Why even a failed test makes North Korea’s nuclear arsenal scarier

By Sharon Squassoni
January 8, 2016

Ko Yun-hwa (L), Administrator of Korea Meteorological Administration, points at where seismic waves observed in South Korea came from, during a media briefing at Korea Meteorological Administration in Seoul, South Korea, January 6, 2016. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji      TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY      - RTX217LM

Ko Yun-hwa (l), Administrator of Korea Meteorological Administration, points at where seismic waves observed in South Korea came from, during a media briefing at Korea Meteorological Administration in Seoul, South Korea, January 6, 2016. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

from The Great Debate:

Happy nuclear New Year from North Korea’s Kim Jong-un

By Paul French
January 6, 2016

North Korean soldiers, officials and people participate in the Pyongyang People's Rally to celebrate what the North says is a successful second nuclear test at the Pyongyang Gym May 26, 2009 in this picture released by North Korea's official news agency KCNA early May 27, 2009. The Korean characters on a red propaganda sign (top) read: "Let's arm ourselves more thoroughly with revolutionary ideology of the great leader Kim Il-sung comrade!"   REUTERS/KCNA (NORTH KOREA MILITARY POLITICS) NO THIRD PARTY SALES. NOT FOR USE BY REUTERS THIRD PARTY DISTRIBUTORS. QUALITY FROM SOURCE - RTXO28Z

In 2009, North Korean soldiers, officials and people celebrated the country's successful second nuclear test, in this picture released by North Korea's official news agency KCNA. REUTERS/KCNA 

from The Great Debate:

Worst-case scenarios that are more likely than you think

By Jane Harman
November 13, 2015

A military investigator from Russia stands near the debris of a Russian airliner at its crash site at the Hassana area in Arish city, north Egypt, November 1, 2015. Russia has grounded Airbus A321 jets flown by the Kogalymavia airline, Interfax news agency reported on Sunday, after one of its fleet crashed in Egypt's Sinai Peninsula, killing all 224 people on board. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany - RTX1U8L7

A military investigator from Russia near the debris of a Russian airliner at its crash site at the Hassana area in Arish city, north Egypt, November 1, 2015. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany

from The Great Debate:

Why the U.S. may still have to go to war against Iran

By Bennett Ramberg
October 26, 2015

A general view of the Bushehr main nuclear reactor

The Bushehr main nuclear reactor, 1,200 km (746 miles) south of Tehran, August 21, 2010. REUTERS/Raheb Homavandi

from War College:

Podcast: We were safer from nuclear armageddon during the Cold War

By Jason Fields
August 25, 2015
Participants: Jason Fields, Matthew Gault, Thomas Nichols

Nuclear-tipped missiles and bombs have hovered over the world's head for more than 70 years. As long as 60 years ago, two great nations had developed the capability to destroy the entire world. The only question, it sometimes seemed, was whether the United States or the Soviet Union would be the first to hit the button.

from The Great Debate:

Iran nuclear deal: Why the private sector will decide whether it survives

By Nate Olson
July 15, 2015

A man adjusts signs during the 15th International Oil and Gas Conference  in Tehran

A man adjusts signs during the 15th International Oil and Gas Conference in Tehran, November 1, 2011. REUTERS/Caren Firouz ​

from The Great Debate:

The only safe way to make a nuclear deal with Iran

By Elizabeth Rosenberg and Peter Harrell
July 6, 2015

U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and U.S. Under Secretary for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman meet with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif at a hotel in Vienna

Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, Secretary of State John Kerry and Under Secretary for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman (L-3rd L) meet with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif (2nd R) at a hotel in Vienna, Austria, June 28, 2015. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

from The Great Debate:

Options for the U.S. if Iran breaks a nuclear deal

By Bennett Ramberg
April 1, 2015

lbj & mac President Lyndon B. Johnson and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara in the White House in Washington, July, 27, 1965. LBJ Presidential Library/Yoichi Okamoto

The success of any nuclear framework agreement negotiated by Iran and the P5+1 (United States, Britain, Russia, Germany, France and China) this week ultimately will be determined not by the signing of a final accord in June but by Tehran’s fidelity to nonproliferation in the years and decades to come.

from The Great Debate:

Get over it: There’s no better deal coming on Iran’s nuclear program

By Paul R. Pillar
February 25, 2015

Officials sit around the negotiations table during their meeting in Vienna

Delegations of Secretary of State John Kerry, Britain's Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif, German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, EU High Representative Catherine Ashton, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi at a meeting in Vienna, November 24, 2014. REUTERS/Joe Klamar/Pool

from The Great Debate:

Iran is using Israel to distract from its real aims in the Persian Gulf

By Anthony H. Cordesman
February 5, 2015

A member of Iran's Revolutionary guard stands at attention during an anti-U.S. ceremony in Azadi (freedom) Square in Tehran April 25, 2010. REUTERS/Morteza Nikoubazl

A member of Iran's Revolutionary guard stands at attention during an anti-U.S. ceremony in Azadi (freedom) Square in Tehran April 25, 2010. REUTERS/Morteza Nikoubazl