from Breakingviews:

Election reveals clear calculus: 47 pct > 1 pct

November 9, 2012

By Jeffrey Goldfarb
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from John Lloyd:

Wanted: Equitable capitalism, profitable socialism

By John Lloyd
October 23, 2012

Socialism – real, no-private-ownership, state-controlled, egalitarian socialism – has been off the political agenda in most states, including Communist China, for decades. The mixture of gross inefficiency and varying degrees of repressive savagery that most such systems showed seems to have inoculated the world against socialism and confined support for it to the arts and sociology faculties of Western universities. But what was booted triumphantly out the front door of history may be knocking quietly on the back door of the present. The reason is inequality.

from The Great Debate:

The radical right-wing roots of Occupy Wall Street

By Maureen Tkacik
September 20, 2012

If there’s one thing that united Occupy Wall Street with the Tea Party movement from the very beginning, it’s a virulent aversion to being compared to each other.

from Photographers' Blog:

Occupy Happy Birthday

September 18, 2012

By Lucas Jackson

It has been one year since a group of protesters began sleeping on the ground in Zuccotti Park to protest growing income inequality, corporate influence on politics, climate change, and a number of other issues.

from Reihan Salam:

How the Occupy movement may yet lead America

By Reihan Salam
September 14, 2012

This coming Monday, Sept. 17, is the first anniversary of the day when protesters gathered in Lower Manhattan’s Zuccotti Park under the banner of Occupy Wall Street. The occupation was first dreamed up by Kalle Lasn and Micah White, the close collaborators behind Adbusters, a slickly produced, high-art magazine that uses the tools of commercial culture to make the case against capitalism. Having decided that America needed an uprising akin to those that had shattered authoritarian governments across North Africa, Lasn and White chose a date, created an arresting image emblazoned with the Occupy Wall Street slogan, reached out to potential collaborators and then watched as their creation seized the imagination of millions of Americans.

from Hugo Dixon:

The revolution will be organized

By Hugo Dixon
June 29, 2012

This piece first appeared in Reuters Magazine.

Is it possible that rebel leaders are overrated? In the wake of the Arab Spring, the Occupy Wall Street movement, and other populist uprisings around the world against autocracy and corruption, geopolitical analysts are asking fundamental questions about what leadership means in such struggles. What sort of leadership is needed in nonviolent uprisings? And in this digital age, do rebellions even need leaders?

from Photographers' Blog:

A voice of Occupy Wall Street

June 12, 2012

By Andrew Burton

When the Occupy Wall Street movement began their Spring Training sessions earlier this year, I realized I had focused much of my coverage throughout the fall of 2011 on the most sensationalistic events - large marches, mass arrests and sporadic violence. It dawned on me that I had seen very little photojournalistic work, from myself or other photographers, looking at Occupy Wall Street's more mundane or personal aspects - essentially, who the protesters were beyond the demonstrations.

from The Great Debate:

How Occupy Wall Street (mostly) won me over

By Suresh Naidu
June 8, 2012

This essay is adapted from a chapter of From Cairo to Wall Street: Voices from the Global Spring, recently published by The New Press.

from Breakingviews:

Even Predators’ Ball saves a dance for 99 pct

May 2, 2012

By Rob Cox
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Chrystia Freeland:

Trickle-down consumption

By Chrystia Freeland
March 22, 2012

We know now that trickle-down economics doesn't really work – the past decade in the United States has seen incomes at the very top soar, while the earnings of the middle class stagnated or declined. But a growing body of academic research is suggesting that this benign force’s wicked stepsister, a phenomenon two economists have dubbed ‘‘trickle-down consumption,’’ is having a powerful impact on the economy and politics of the United States.