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from MacroScope:

Yield is king in China’s ‘dim sum’ offshore yuan bond markets

 

A return to China's offshore yuan bond markets, or "dim sum” as they are colorfully known in Hong Kong, may be sweet for Gemdale, a mainland property developer. But not all fund managers are smiling. The company raised five-year money at 5.63% amounting to 2 billion yuan. Not bad, considering that last July, it raised a lesser sum for a shorter tenor while coughing up nearly double of what it paid this time around. Add the fact that it did so by keeping to the same weak bond covenant and Gemdale seems to have pulled off a stunner.

But Gemdale doesn’t seem to be the only one. In recent days, issuers with weak bond covenants have discovered a ready market for their debt and at much cheaper rates. In theory, bond covenants can be divided into two halves: affirmative and negative ones. The former promises to pay bond holders on time while the latter forbids it from exceeding certain financial ratios such as interest paid/EBITDA, debt to equity, etc. And of course, they are secured by the company's assets or backed by bank guarantees or letters of credit

But when theory meets reality (read: offshore hunger for yield meets hungry onshore Chinese issuers), financial "creativity" is the outcome. So mainland companies set up complicated structures to ensure they are able to keep regulators and ratings agencies happy while getting access to cheap capital quickly without having to negotiate labyrinthine approvals processes.

And has that system thrived. Fidelity Investments says Chinese offshore bond issuance is the fastest growing sub-set of the greater Asian dollar and the dim sum bond markets. Offshore issuance by Chinese companies in both the dollar and the offshore RMB markets have boomed over the last two years and the fund manager says 16 companies amounting to USD 9 billion have such structures.

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