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from Breakingviews:

Ecuador economic ‘miracle’ meets maturity

By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

Turn on state television here, and within an hour or so a public service message will appear extolling the “Ecuadorean miracle” of President Rafael Correa. The advertisements highlight big new infrastructure projects and endorsements by experts, even an American or two.

Coming on one of the many formerly private channels that Correa tucked under government control during his seven years in office, it’s easy to dismiss this as propaganda. Yet here’s the thing: nearly every ordinary Ecuadorean I met during a recent stay was able to answer the Reaganesque question, “Are you better off now?” in the resounding affirmative.

To the amazement of Correa’s critics, Ecuador has undergone a relatively sustained period of economic progress since he took office in 2007. Annual growth in gross domestic product has averaged 4 percent. Unemployment is below 5 percent. Wages are up. Inflation is a tame 3.1 percent thanks to the dollarization of the economy before his accession. The percentage of Ecuador’s 16 million people living below the poverty line has dropped to 25 percent from some 45 percent before Correa became president.

from Expert Zone:

How falling crude prices affect India

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not necessarily those of Thomson Reuters)

Brent crude prices have dropped below $100 a barrel, causing anxiety within the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and giving some relief to India and China. The market is bearish at present but the future is unpredictable.

from Breakingviews:

Double-digit oil promises lubrication not seizure

By Ian Campbell

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Double-digit oil is a welcome sign, not a harbinger of deflationary doom. The decline of the price of a barrel of Brent crude to just below $100, down 13 percent from its June peak, is good disinflation. It will help consumer spending and global economic recovery.

from Expert Zone:

India Markets Weekahead: Time to prune positions in an extended honeymoon

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

The Nifty closed at a new closing high of 7,954 amid volatility in an eventful week that started with the Supreme Court ruling that the allocation of more than 200 coal blocks over the past two decades was illegal.

With nearly 3 trillion rupees at stake, this had a direct effect on the metals and power sector. It also affected banking, which has exposure to the two sectors.

from Global Markets Forum Dashboard:

U.S. shale revolution continues to upend geopolitics

Dominick Chirichella, president, Energy Management Institute

Dominick Chirichella, president, Energy Management Institute

Oil traders who bet on rising prices were hit with a double whammy on Tuesday in the way of announcements from the top two energy data agencies. The still-nascent U.S. shale energy revolution is upending eons-old geopolitical events and it still seems to be in the early days.

Global energy watchdog the International Energy Agency revised lower its outlook for oil demand this year back to 2012 levels as the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) said July U.S. oil production rose to its highest in more than a quarter century.

from MacroScope:

Moment of truth for EU sanctions

The logo of Russia's top crude producer Rosneft is seen in Moscow

President Barack Obama and the leaders of Germany, Britain, France and Italy agreed on a conference call last night to impose wider sanctions on Russia’s financial, defence and energy sectors.

EU ambassadors are meeting today and are expected to target state-owned Russian banks and their ability to finance Moscow's faltering economy.

from Counterparties:

Drill, baby, drill

North Dakota is in the middle of something the rest of the country can only dream of: an economic boom. The state has become a massive success story over the last five years, with unemployment at 2.6 percent and its population growing rapidly to fill demand for oil jobs. “The state's modern history has been rewritten by the energy industry in just four short years,” writes Bloomberg’s Nicholas Kusnetz. But is it sustainable? Thanks to the shale boom, the state is currently producing as much oil in a month as it did in all of 2004, and production is growing at an exponential rate. That kind of growth can’t go on forever, says Fivethirtyeight’s Ben Casselman. Eventually it’s going to have to flatten out, and that has major implications for the economic stability of a state that has been very suddenly made rich (and just as suddenly dependent on this oil production).

Predictably, Katie Brown, at Energy In Depth (which is funded by the Independent Petroleum Association of America) says Casselman is wrong. It’s not just about recoverable oil, but about changing technology, she says. The U.S. Geological Surveyrecently doubled its estimate of the amount of recoverable oil in North Dakota, an estimate which is up 25-fold since 1995, according to Brown. Better technology is going to mean more oil, essentially. “It’s important not to get trapped by assumptions of static technology, especially in an industry like oil and gas, where innovators have proved over and over ... that the recoverability of resources increases over time,” Brown writes.

from Counterparties:

MORNING BID – Crypto-sale of the Century

Details on the sale of about 30,000 bitcoin have been spare, but what can be inferred by reading through the lines is that the sale of about $18 million went a lot better than many expected - particularly those who expected to get the coins on the cheap somehow. The prevailing market rate at the end of Monday was about $639, according to Coindesk, currently the leader in the pricing world, and the chatter trickling out was that the unsuccessful bidders - including hedge fund Pantera and SecondMarket's Barry Silber, who put together a consortium of more than 40 bidders - aimed too low in one of those "Price is Right" moves but without the warmth of Bob Barker to confront you when you lose on these things.

With that in mind the speculation on just where the auction ended up can run wild - did it go for $650? $700 for the lot? Perhaps; those commenting on twitter and to Reuters in a story from Gertrude Chavez and Nate Raymond on Monday were suggesting that there were plenty of newer bidders in the process, firms that have been just getting going in the bitcoin world and probably wouldn't mind to get their hands on a large stake even at a somewhat elevated price.

from The Great Debate:

Why the shift to alternate energies continues, despite shale boom

Thousands of solar panels are pictured generating electricity used at Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas

Oil prices are rising as uncertainty grows over the fate of major producers like Russia and Iraq. Everything from transportation to manufacturing to a petroleum-intensive agricultural system is a puppet flailing on the strings of this volatile commodity.

Meanwhile, increased production of alternative power is finally making prices more competitive, particularly for solar energy, as former Vice President Al Gore recently pointed out in Rolling Stone. Costs have declined dramatically -- 20 percent a year since 2010. This is not yet reflected in energy prices, however, largely because of the major tax breaks still extended to the dirty technology of the past.

from Breakingviews:

Iraq troubles are unlikely to bring new oil crisis

By Fiona Maharg-Bravo

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

The continued violence in Iraq looks like a harbinger of a sharp cutback from the world’s seventh-largest oil producer. But the bulk of Iraq’s production is still secure. Even though the Middle East has clearly become less stable, it will still take a cascade of problems to create a big oil price shock.

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