Archive

Reuters blog archive

from Unstructured Finance:

Talking straight with money managers, policy makers and econ gurus

By Matthew Goldstein and Jennifer Ablan

We may not be TV people but there's something to be said for just sitting down and doing a video interview to discuss the big issues of the day. And that's just what we did as part of this year's Reuters Investment Outlook Summit and it's something we hope to keep doing as  a regular feature going forward into the new year.

In advance of this year's summit, we did videos with noted short-seller Carson Block, bond guru Dan Fuss, OWS bank leader Cathy O'Neill, FBI heads April Brooks and David Chaves, Avenue Capital's Marc Lasry, economist Henry Kaufman and Steven Gluckstern of eminent domain fame. The videos were frank discussions and to make them seem more natural we went outside the environs of our Reuters newsroom in NYC and conducted them in places like the  middle of Times Square, an ice ream shop and a park.

But best of all these videos broke some news. For instance, we learned the FBI is now using Twitter as an investigative tool and that Carson Block is thinking about starting a short only hedge fund.

So far we've posted four videos online, with the ones with Fuss and Lasry still to come. We'll update this post once those are out as well.

from Unstructured Finance:

Becoming comfortably numb to income inequality

By Matthew Goldstein and Jennifer Ablan

About a year ago, Nobel Prize-winning liberal economist Joseph Stiglitz made a surprise appearance at the Occupy Wall Street camp site in Zuccotti Park, giving a speech to rally the protestors and support their causes of bringing attention to the economic divide between the 1 percent and everyone else in the U.S.

Today, the protestors in lower Manhattan have all but disappeared with the attention on Occupy Wall Street gone along with it.

from Photographers' Blog:

Occupy Happy Birthday

By Lucas Jackson

It has been one year since a group of protesters began sleeping on the ground in Zuccotti Park to protest growing income inequality, corporate influence on politics, climate change, and a number of other issues.

SLIDESHOW: RETURN OF OCCUPY

One year ago no-one had heard of Occupy Wall St. and it was fascinating to watch the excitement and size of the protest grow over time. What began as a rag tag group of people who came together to make a semi-permanent presence near Wall St. to spread their message in the heart of the New York financial district quickly grew. For those of us who live and work in New York it was a refreshing change to have a news story grow organically in a city where everything is always polished and shined to dullness in order to present to the media.

from Photographers' Blog:

A voice of Occupy Wall Street

By Andrew Burton

When the Occupy Wall Street movement began their Spring Training sessions earlier this year, I realized I had focused much of my coverage throughout the fall of 2011 on the most sensationalistic events - large marches, mass arrests and sporadic violence. It dawned on me that I had seen very little photojournalistic work, from myself or other photographers, looking at Occupy Wall Street's more mundane or personal aspects - essentially, who the protesters were beyond the demonstrations.

SLIDESHOW: LIFE OF AN OCCUPY ACTIVIST

I decided to approach Austin Guest to see if he'd be interested in allowing me to follow him as an individual. Guest is an organizer, videographer and creative-action planner in the movement. I had seen him lead marches, moderate group conversations and give speeches - in essence, I had been impressed at his ability to speak to groups and lead large rallies. Austin was open to the idea and over the past month I've tried to spend as much time with him as possible - before, during and after events, with friends, at the bar, eating dinner, shopping for supplies and training for future events.

from Anthony De Rosa:

Tim Pool: Occupy Wall Street’s mobile journalist – Tech Tonic

If you were to stop independent journalist Tim Pool on the street, you may think he's just a bike messenger, with his skull cap, hoodie and shoulder strap bag. What you may miss is that Pool has transformed himself into a mobile journalist. He broadcast live videos in the midst of the Occupy movement using just an iPhone, a solar powered backpack and even a drone to an audience of thousands.

from Photographers' Blog:

Chaos descends on Occupy Oakland

By Stephen Lam

It all started like a normal day covering Occupy Oakland. But little did I know it was going to be one of the most intense protests I’ve ever covered.

I arrived at Oakland City Hall around 1pm and there was already a sizable crowd gathered in preparation for the march. I was a bit surprised to see people carrying shields, but I didn’t think much of it and proceeded to photograph the protest as I normally would.

from Full Focus:

Images of November

November wasn't defined by a single event but rather a series of ongoing stories around the globe. Protesters returned to Cairo's Tahrir Square demanding an end to military rule. There was also the spread of the Occupy movement, followed by evictions from major locations around the world. Elections took place in Liberia and the Democratic Republic of Congo and floods ravaged Thailand, submerging the capital, Bangkok.

from Political Theater:

Gingrich to OWS: “Go get a job — right after you take a bath”

At the GOP Thanksgiving Family Forum debate on "family issues" on Saturday, Newt Gingrich accused Occupy Wall Street protesters of acting entitled. "All the Occupy movements start with a premise that we all owe them everything,” he argued:

They take over a public park they didn’t pay for, to go nearby to use bathrooms they didn’t pay for, to beg for food from places they they don’t want to pay for, to obstruct those who are going to work to pay the taxes to sustain the bathrooms and to sustain the park so that they can self-righteously explain that they are the paragons of virtue to which we owe everything.”

from Photographers' Blog:

Occupying Starbucks

By Paul Hackett

I left the Occupy protest camp at St Paul's cathedral in London to go to Starbucks to file the pictures that I had taken. As I walked through the door I saw this man sitting there; of course it made me smile. I took a few images of him and then a member of staff put their hand over my lens. I knew that I had something, so it was fine. I sat close to him, got his name (Adam Murray) and sent the picture in. It was with the office a few minutes after I took it - I wish they were all that easy!

  •