from The Great Debate:

A uniquely French recipe for unrest

By Alan Chin
January 29, 2015

French riot policemen fire rubber bullets behind a burning car during clashes in Villiers le Bel

French riot policemen fire rubber bullets behind a burning car during clashes one day after two youths died in a motorbike accident with a police car in Villiers le Bel in the northern suburb of Paris, Nov. 26, 2007. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

from The Great Debate:

Most French Muslims and Jews shared a long, complex history before coming to France

By Arthur Asseraf and Elizabeth Marcus
January 19, 2015

A Jewish worshipper prays during a pilgrimage to the El Ghriba synagogue in Djerba

“Jews have no problems with Arabs.”

Those were the words of Benjamin Hattab, the father of Yoav Hattab, one of the four killed last week in an attack on a Paris kosher grocery store, which followed the Charlie Hebdo shootings. Hattab is Tunisian and serves as the chief rabbi of the Muslim-majority North African nation -- his comments, made in an interview after the attack, referred to his experience in Tunisia, not in France.

from The Great Debate:

To become ‘French,’ abandon who you are

By Justin Gest
January 16, 2015


PHOTO (TOP): A young Muslim girl has two French flags and a headband reading "Fraternity" on her headscarf while marching to protest a French ban on religious symbols in state schools, Paris, January 31, 2004. REUTERS/Charles Platiau

from The Great Debate:

Netanyahu’s invitation to French Jews was awkward. For many reasons.

By Dimi Reider
January 14, 2015

French President Francois Hollande welcomes Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the Elysee Palace before attending a solidarity march in the streets of Paris

On Sunday, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu made an impassioned call for French Jews to immigrate to Israel, after a series of attacks that began on the day of the Charlie Hebdo massacre killed four in a kosher supermarket in Paris. To many, it seemed like the most natural response he could deliver. After all, this is Israel’s stated raison d’etre: to provide refuge to persecuted Jews, wherever they may be. Underlying this sentiment is a deeper one, shared by Israelis across the political spectrum. It is the idea that Jewish life is at its most meaningful, and relevant, if carried out in the Jewish state.

from The Great Debate:

Charlie Hebdo fallout: Specter of fascist past haunts European nationalism

By Jacob Heilbrunn
January 13, 2015

Members of DUEGIDA, Duesseldorf's section of anti-immigration movement Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamisation of the West (PEGIDA) demonstrate in Duesseldorf

When up to a dozen world leaders and roughly 1.5 million people gathered in Paris on Sunday to mourn the murder of 10 editors and cartoonists of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo and seven other people by three French-born Islamic radicals, they wanted to demonstrate that Europe will always embrace liberal and tolerant values.

from The Great Debate:

‘Charlie Hebdo’: High-impact, low-tech tactics add chilling dimension to attacks

By Matthew Green
January 9, 2015

French soldier patrol near the Eiffel Tower in Paris as part of the highest level of "Vigipirate" security

In the aftermath of 9/11, the biggest fear that haunted U.S. counter-terrorism officials was that al-Qaeda or its allies would somehow get hold of a weapon of mass destruction: a biological agent or a nuclear bomb.

from The Great Debate:

World’s cartoonists respond to the attack on ‘Charlie Hebdo’

By Jason Fields
January 7, 2015

The outpouring in reaction to the killing of 12 in an attack on the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris -- known for its cartoons that took on politicians and religious figures, including the Prophet Mohammad -- was spontaneous and pointed. Below is a sampling of some of the cartoons that are being shared on Twitter, most with the hashtag #jesuischarlie -- I am Charlie.

from Photographers' Blog:

Star of the gypsy circus

October 25, 2013

Paris, France

By Philippe Wojazer

“I want to become one of the best Flamenco dancers” said Roujenka, 13, the youngest daughter of Romanes Circus founders, Delia and Alexandre. The circus, located on the outskirts of Paris, is a small Gypsy circus and is entirely family-run. It is comprised of a tent in an enclave along this busy Parisian boulevard.

from Photographers' Blog:

Living as a Muslim in Paris

By Youssef Boudlal
August 15, 2013

Paris, France

By Youssef Boudlal

Photographing the daily life of Muslims in Paris is a challenge. I discovered this by throwing myself into the project, which rapidly became a story of failed encounters, rejection and disappointment. Among the people I met, the fear of prejudice towards the Muslim world was intense, as was the worry that cliches about the community could be fueled or spread by images.

from Photographers' Blog:

Fresh food on Paris rooftops

July 25, 2013

Paris, France

By Philippe Wojazer

Have you ever eaten vegetables grown in central Paris? I have.

“What about growing some carrots in our house’s courtyard or radishes on the balcony?” asked one of my daughters. She said she had heard engineer Nicolas Bel's interview on the subject. So I called him. As with all those with passions, he could speak about his studies for hours and make you suddenly feel part of it.