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from MuniLand:

Can Philadelphia borrow to save its schools?

Philadelphia will borrow $50 million to fund the opening of its school system on September 9th. Reuters reported:

The city of Philadelphia will borrow $50 million in the capital market for its cash-strapped public schools so they can rehire about 1,000 furloughed employees and open on time on Sept. 9, Mayor Michael Nutter said on Thursday.

It’s not clear, however, that Philadelphia can assume debt for the school. I discovered this while reading the Philadelphia school district financial statement (page B-93):

[T]he School District is a separate and independent home rule school district of the first class formally established by the Philadelphia Home Rule Charter (the “Charter”) in December of 1965. The Philadelphia Home Rule Charter Act, P.L. 643 (the “Act”) expressly limits the powers of the City by prohibiting the City from, among other things, assuming the debt of the School District or enacting legislation regulating public education and its administration except only to set tax rates for school purposes as authorized by the General Assembly of the Commonwealth.

from MuniLand:

Philadelphia should address its basic issues

Philadelphia held its bond investor conference last week. Although the press was not allowed to attend, the city did post the presentations on its website. Philadelphia Inquirer reporter Joe DiStefano neatly summarized the city’s political and fiscal position, which is not as rosy as the presentations make it seem:

Philadelphia hopes to borrow more than $1 billion by selling or refinancing bonds over the next nine months. For all the city's growth around Center City, the colleges and the Navy Yard, officials face some big challenges: the lowest credit ratings of the biggest U.S. cities (low credit ratings tend to boost borrowing costs, though current interest rates are near rock-bottom levels); the financial near-collapse at the School District; the scheduled end of the sales-tax surcharge; labor negotiations and court decisions that have mostly upheld city labor union positions and reversed Nutter administration cost-cutting schemes; a thwarted real estate tax reform; stagnant office growth; high poverty in worn city neighborhoods; and more.

from MuniLand:

Muniland has a disclosure problem

There is a glaring gap in regulation - called Regulation Fair Disclosure - when it comes to protecting municipal bond investors. It appears that issuers may be in the habit of giving material nonpublic information to preferred institutional investors, while making retail and non-preferred investors sit out in the cold. Exhibit number one is the treatment of media members who have petitioned to attend the City of Philadelphia bond investor day scheduled for this Thursday. The Philadelphia Inquirer wrote:

Several news organizations led by Bloomberg News are protesting the exclusion of the news media from a two-day conference sponsored by the Nutter administration to stimulate investor interest in the city's municipal bonds.

from Unstructured Finance:

Tyrone Gilliams fights the law

By Matthew Goldstein

It's been a while since we last wrote about the legal struggles of Tyrone Gilliams, the Philadelphia commodities trader/hip-hop promoter/wannabe reality show star/self-styled preacher, whom federal authorities have charged with scamming investors out of $5 million. But the University of Pennslyania graduate is making news again with the scheduled start of his Jan. 22 criminal trial in New York federal court.

Gilliams will be on trial with his former lawyer Everette Scott. Both men are charged with working together to "devise a scheme and artifice to defraud" investors out of their money that was supposed to have been invested in Treasury Strips--a derivative of U.S. Treasury bonds the separates the coupon and principal on the underlying note into different securities.

from MuniLand:

How American municipalities can learn from Parisian mistakes

Across the nation cash-strapped municipalities are considering the sale of their public-utility systems. These moves are intended to raise cash and rid the municipalities of expensive liabilities such as debt service and pension obligations. But officials considering this approach might do well to look to France and other nations that are rapidly moving in the opposite direction with a "remunicipalization" of their utility systems. In 2010, Paris, in the best known case of remunicipalization, ended contracts with the world's two biggest water service companies, Suez and Veolia, bringing an end to their 100-year private duopoly. The reversal of a century-old practice in Paris was an acceleration of an international movement away from private control. Per remunicipalisation.org:

In the 1990s many countries privatised their water and sanitation services, particularly in the [hemispheric] South, as a result of strong pressure from neoliberal mindset governments and international financial institutions, to ‘open’ up national services.

from Photographers' Blog:

World War Z goes to Glasgow

By David Moir

The post-apocalyptic horror novel, ‘World War Z’, by Max Brooks, has been adapted into a film starring Brad Pitt and Mireille Enos and directed by Marc Forster. It has started filming in Scotland. The set is mainly on the streets in and around George Square in Glasgow, with its open space and architecture, substituting for Philadelphia.

Road signs have been put up telling you 16th Street, J F Kennedy Boulevard and Ben Franklin Bridge are just around the corner so hopefully you feel like you are in Philly, certainly some of the tourists from the U.S. I’ve spoken to seem to give it the thumbs up.

from MacroScope:

Philly Fed – the nightmare index economists can’t grasp

"Horrendous"

"Stink"

"Meltdown"

These are just a few of the (printable) words analysts have used to describe the August release of the Philadelphia Fed's factory activity index.

And well they might -- the Philly Fed has proven to be a nightmare indicator for economists. At -30.7 in August, the index came in far below the consensus forecast for a rise to +3.7 from July's +3.2. Even the lowest forecast was only -10.

from MuniLand:

Muni sweeps: Municipal unrest

Mayors take out the pitchforks

William Alden of Huffington Post writes about a "testy" encounter between mayors and federal officials. The federal dollars for municipalities from the American Recovery Act have basically ended and revenues for state and local governments remain weak. We should expect to see more of this.

The federal officials on stage were speaking in broad, theoretical terms. But the mayors wouldn't stand for that. They knew what needed to get done, they said. What they wanted from Washington was the dollars to do it.

from MuniLand:

Muni sweeps: Strutting her stuff

Philly mummers 2009

She may not be the prettiest girl but at least she's out there

The home of the famous Mummer's parade struts its stuff for the bond markets.

The city of Philadelphia was named tops for transparency in a University of Illinois at Chicago survey of cities providing investors with financial information online.

Every municipality, like every person, has problems. Hiding them doesn't instill confidence in investors. I'm glad to see Philly and other cities letting it all hang out. From the the Philadelphia Inquirer:

from FaithWorld:

Guestview: “Trifecta” of bad news launched Catholics4Change blog

philly 1

(Protesters near the courthouse before a hearing on the Archdiocese of Philadelphia sexual abuse scandal in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, March 14, 2011/Tim Shaffer)

The following is a guest contribution. Reuters is not responsible for the content and the views expressed are the authors’ alone. Elizabeth E. Evans is a freelance writer, columnist and priest-in-charge at St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Honey Brook, Pennsylvania.

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