from The Great Debate:

Why the Democratic nomination race won’t be a Clinton coronation

By Bill Schneider
July 14, 2015

Former Senator James Webb (D-VA) holds up a union card as he addresses the International Association of Firefighters delegates at IAFF Presidential Forum

Former Senator James Webb holds up a union card as he addresses the International Association of Firefighters delegates at IAFF Presidential Forum in Washington, March 10, 2015. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

from The Great Debate:

Who’s the real populist in this presidential campaign?

By Robert L. Borosage
June 16, 2015

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Clinton delivers her "official launch speech" at a campaign kick off rally on Roosevelt Island in New York City

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton delivers her campaign kick-off speech at Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park on Roosevelt Island in New York City, June 13, 2015. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

from The Great Debate:

Top 5 political predictions for 2015

By Bill Schneider
December 16, 2014

Hillary Clinton speaks on "Smart Power: Security Through Inclusive Leadership"  at Georgetown University in Washington

1. The Obama boom will finally arrive.  Only it will be more like a boomlet.

Americans have been waiting for the boom since they elected President Barack Obama in the teeth of the 2008 financial meltdown. After all, we elected Ronald Reagan during an economic downturn in 1980, and by his second term, the economy had turned around (“Morning in America”).  We elected Bill Clinton in an economic downturn in 1992, and by his second term, the economy had come roaring back (the “dot-com boom,” now known as the “dot-com bubble”).  Now we're deep into Obama's second term. Where's da boom?

from Hugo Dixon:

What to do about populism?

By Hugo Dixon
November 24, 2014

By Hugo Dixon

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Despite election results, reason still rules Europe

By Anatole Kaletsky
May 30, 2014

anatole -- french student

When can a vote of 25 percent be described as a “stunning victory” or even a “political earthquake”?

from The Great Debate:

Elites focus on inequality; real people just want growth

By Bill Schneider
May 5, 2014

kochs & warrenThe economic debate is now sharply focused on the issue of income inequality. That may not be the debate Democrats want to have, however. It's negative and divisive. Democrats would be better off talking about growth -- a hopeful and unifying agenda.

from The Great Debate:

Populism? Where are the pitchforks?

By Robert L. Borosage
April 16, 2014

Americans are in a surly mood, confronting rules they feel are rigged against them. President Barack Obama captured this populist temper in his re-election campaign.  He then launched his second term declaring that inequality is the “most pressing challenge of our time,” and laying out a popular agenda to raise the federal minimum wage, provide pay equity for women, establish universal pre-school and other initiatives that polls show the public strongly supports.

from The Great Debate:

The first woman president is not about the past

By Bill Schneider
February 27, 2014

Want to know the latest meme in U.S. politics? Here it is: Hillary Clinton is a candidate of the past.

from Lawrence Summers:

On inequality

By Lawrence Summers
February 17, 2014

Inequality has emerged as a major economic issue in the United States and beyond.

from The Great Debate:

Populism: The Democrats’ great divide

By Robert L. Borosage
February 5, 2014

One day after President Barack Obama called for moving forward on trade authority in his State of the Union address, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) declared, “I am against fast track,” and said he had no intention of bringing it to a vote in the Senate.