from Oddly Enough Blog:

Indiana Obama and the Bail-Out of Gold!

June 10, 2009

Mr. Spielberg, I know we didn't plan to make any more Indiana Jones movies, but this opportunity is just too good to pass up.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

What’s wrong with this picture?

June 9, 2009

Blog Guy, can you clear something up for me? I saw photos of President Barack Obama and other major European leaders at the D-Day ceremonies in France, but there is one guy in a uniform who isn't identified.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Just drive in circles while I finish my candy bar!

June 5, 2009

This photo from yesterday, showing a presidential snack, has me baffled.

See, the president just landed in Germany on Air Force One. He gets off the plane and into his limo, and suddenly, HE'S EATING A CANDY BAR!

from DealZone:

Driven to the brink

May 15, 2009

fritz1In Detroit, it is a fact of life that you are what you drive.

GM and Chrysler have staked their future -- and some $20 billion of taxpayer-backed loans -- on the idea that they can reinvent themselves as lean, green and mean manufacturers of small and fuel-efficient cars and electric-drive vehicles.

from Tales from the Trail:

Gaffes and protocol slips in the Obama/”Buden” White House

May 5, 2009

It's May 4th, but the White House decided to celebrate Cinco de Mayo (the fifth of May) a day early.
    That's not exactly a breach of protocol, but introducing the Mexican ambassador and then not letting him speak kind of is.
USA/OBAMA    That's what President Barack Obama did on Monday at a White House ceremony to highlight the Mexican holiday.
    "Welcome to Cinco de Cuatro -- Cinco de Mayo at the White House," Obama told a group of mostly Hispanic guests at the executive mansion. "We are a day early, but we always like to get a head start here at the Obama White House."
    After making brief remarks Obama introduced the Mexican ambassador, Arturo Sarukhan, and his wife, Valencia.
    But as Sarukhan made his way to the podium, the president and first lady Michelle Obama made their way into the crowd and started shaking hands.
    As crowds go, shaking hands with Barack Obama has a way of trumping speeches from Mexican ambassadors, so the noise level in the White House's Grand Foyer rose and the ambassador looked like he wasn't going to get to that speech.
    Whoops. The president realized his mistake, stopped shaking hands, and came back to the podium to urge quiet.
    "In an incredible breach of protocol, I introduced my good friend, the Ambassador, but he has greetings from the people of Mexico," Obama said. "So I take complete responsibility for that.  I apologize.  Will everybody please settle down, and let's hear from our Ambassador from Mexico."
    Applause, applause, and all was well. Sarukhan delivered his remarks and the crowd went back to partying.
    The gaffe was not the only one to come out of the White House on Monday. Earlier in the day Vice President Biden's office sent out a statement that it had to correct minutes later. The mistake? The boss's name was misspelled.
    "Vice President Buden Kicks Off $32 million Renovation and Restoration of Wilimington Train Station" the announcement read.

from Funds Hub:

A loud and clear call

February 23, 2009

rtr1y8m4It may not have been a massive surprise, but ECB President Jean-Claude Trichet had an unwelcome message for hedge fund managers today.

from Photographers' Blog:

Bush years: Defining his presidency

January 19, 2009

As I take my last pictures of George W. Bush as President just days before Barack Obama’s inauguration, I reflect on what it was like to cover the 43rd President of the United States for the past six years.

from Photographers' Blog:

Bush years: Impressions of the man in office

January 19, 2009

Bush has faced many battles in his tenure. Record low approval ratings, a failing economy, the September 11 attacks, a war with no near end in sight, and for the last year, most of the world was looking more to his successor, than to the sitting President himself.

from Photographers' Blog:

Bush years: Good, bad and ugly

January 19, 2009

Reuters Washington staff photographer Kevin Lamarque made the move to White House coverage in 1999. Before that, he was covering London politics spanning the end of Margaret Thatcher, the John Major years, and the beginning of the Tony Blair era.  Washington proved to be an interesting contrast.  He has covered the final two years of the President Bill Clinton, and all eight years of President George W. Bush.

from Photographers' Blog:

Bush years: First-time history

January 19, 2009

Larry Downing is a Reuters senior staff photographer assigned to the White House. He shares that duty with three other staff photographers. He has lived in Washington since 1977 and has been assigned to cover the White House since 1978. He worked for United Press International and Newsweek Magazine before joining Reuters as a stringer in 1997 and then as staff in 1999.