Archive

Reuters blog archive

from Full Focus:

Israel’s tent city

Photo

Photographer Nir Elias has been covering the ongoing demonstrations against the high cost of living in Israel. In this series Nir documents Tel Aviv's tent city by combining portraits of protesters with images of their street dwelling.

from Photographers' Blog:

Chile’s dog days

Photo

By Ivan Alvarado

Today it seems the dictatorship ended only recently….

A newspaper front page shows a dog participating in the demonstrations in Chile. It seems that anything can happen these troubled days around the world, so between slogans and statements it makes sense to write a blog about street dogs and demonstrations.

“Free quality education.” - Student movement
“Nothing is free in life.” - President Sebastian Pinera
“Education should not be for profit.” - Student movement
“Gang of useless subversives.” - Carlos Larrain, president of the ruling party
“We don’t need mediators, and especially not from the Catholic Church.” - Camila Vallejo, student leader.
“It’s going to fall, it’s going to fall….the education of Pinochet.” – Demonstrators.
“Education is a commodity.” – President Pinera.
“The government exaggerates the students’ claims to demonize them.” - Mario Waissbluth, expert on education.
“The only thing they [the demonstrators] want to do is destroy the country and us.” – Chile’s National Police.
“I’m a gardener and I want my son to be an engineer.” – Street graffiti.

from George Chen:

China’s toxic leaks and social unrest

By George Chen
The opinions expressed are the author’s own.

What does PX mean? That's the keyword for China from the past 24 hours.

State media reported that residents of Dalian were recently forced to flee when a storm battering the northeast Chinese coast, whipping up waves that burst through a dyke protecting a local chemical plant. The plant produces paraxylene (PX), a toxic petrochemical used in polyester.

On Sunday, some angry residents finally decided that instead of being forced to flee, the chemical plant should be relocated.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Decorating with a brain and a crane…

Photo

Blog Guy, several months ago you analyzed the Libyan conflict by comparing the furniture styles of the Gaddafi supporters and the rebels. I believe you called it "Divan intervention in Libya?" What else can we learn by looking at protesters and their furniture?

Good question. Check these demonstrators in Israel in the top photo. They've done a fine job of turning their protest site into a cozy living room.

from Photographers' Blog:

Seven months atop a crane

Photo

With almost seven months atop a crane, a 51-year old woman trade unionist is staging a solo protest to end layoffs at a shipyard in South Korea.

Kim Jin-Suk, 51, climbed the 35-meter tall crane in the Yeongdo shipyard of Hanjin Heavy Industries and Construction (HHIC) in Busan, the hub of South Korea's shipbuilding industry on January 6 this year and has been there ever since to protest against what she says are "mass layoffs" at the country's former biggest shipbuilder.

from FaithWorld:

Catholic area riots after Protestant marches in Northern Ireland

Photo

(Nationalist youths and police in riot gear clash in the Ardoyne area of north Belfast July 12, 2011/Cathal McNaughton)

Police fired plastic bullets and water cannon at Catholic youths in Northern Ireland's provincial capital Belfast on Tuesday after rioting erupted when a Protestant parade passed their estate. Sporadic violence erupted across the British-ruled province on the culmination of a season of parades by pro-British Protestants to mark a 17th-century military victory, a tradition many Catholics say is provocative.

from FaithWorld:

Bangladesh Islamists stage strike against dropping Allah from constitution

Photo

(Members of Islami Andolan Bangladesh, a radical Islamist group set tires on fire as they barricade a highway during a daylong strike in Kachpur near Dhaka July 10, 2011/Andrew Biraj)

Police in Bangladesh Sunday fired tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse Islamist activists trying to enforce a nationwide strike over the removal of a Muslim phrase in the constitution, and witnesses said around 50 people were injured. The clashes erupted when thousands of bludgeon-carrying Islamists cut off a stretch of highway leading to the capital's eastern suburbs with barricades. The protesters also damaged several cargo trucks before the police crackdown, and some 100 people were detained.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

The place with the mostage postage is…

Photo

 

Blog Guy, can you please settle a bet with my dermatologist's sommelier?

Really? On a summer weekend I'm still settling bets for unlikely professionals?

Yes. I say all postage stamps are the same size, but he says the ones in Syria are gigantic.

Pay the man. He's right. Look at this photo above, showing a roll of Syrian first class postage stamps with President Bashar al-Assad's face on them.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Look at the scythe of that knife!

Photo

Honey, I'm goin' shoppin' downtown. You want anything?

I sure do, Earl. We need skim milk, tuna fish, Hostess Ding Dongs, and darn, there was something else...

Oh yeah, daggers! We've got some birthdays coming up and daggers make great gifts.

from FaithWorld:

“Neither God, nor Master” film angers Tunisian Islamists

Photo

(A Tunisian flag at a peaceful demonstration in Tunis January 15, 2011/Zohra Bensemra)

Six months after Tunisia's uprising, religious tension is rising over the limits of freedom of expression, as Islamists challenge the dominance of liberals in what was once a citadel of Arab secularism. Last week several dozen men attacked a cinema in Tunis that had advertised a film publicly titled in French 'Ni Dieu, Ni Maitre' (No God, No Master) by Tunisian-French director Nadia El-Fani, an outspoken critic of political Islam.

  •