from The Great Debate:

Never an excuse for shooting unarmed suspects, former police chief says

By Joseph D. McNamara
August 19, 2014

A police officer points a spotlight at a more vocal and confrontational group of demonstrators during further protests in reaction to the shooting of Michael Brown, near FergusonI was the police chief in Kansas City, Missouri, when an unarmed African-American teenager was shot by a cop for a non-violent issue. The result was a peaceful and constructive public dialogue -- the opposite of what is happening now in Ferguson, Missouri, in the aftermath of the shooting death of Michael Brown, an unarmed 18-year-old.

from Photographers' Blog:

Tour de France Fever

June 30, 2014

Yorkshire, United Kingdom

By Phil Noble

This is a World Cup year, so fans across the globe are getting tossed around on the roller coaster of emotions that goes along with supporting your national soccer team.

from Photographers' Blog:

Where the wild things race

By Nathaniel Wilder
March 20, 2014

Nome, Alaska

By Nathaniel Wilder

The Iditarod is a nearly 1,000-mile-long sled-dog race that pits mushers against each other and the elements as they cross much of Alaska to become the first team to Nome, on the shores of the Bering Sea.

from Photographers' Blog:

Slip slidin’ away

February 3, 2014

New York, New York

By Andrew Kelly

When an editor reaches out to you with: “Want an assignment that involves biking, drinking, Vikings and shopping carts?” there’s only one answer. And with that, I was Reuters’ assigned photographer for Idiotarod 2014.

from The Great Debate:

New York’s election suggests the waning of identity politics

September 11, 2013

To most Americans, the results of New York City’s local elections don’t matter much and often shouldn’t. Yes, there are City Hall occupants who manage to command a national stage, notably incumbent Mike Bloomberg, but in the 2013 race there have been no candidates even approaching his stature (or his wealth). The candidate who received the most votes in Tuesday’s primary, Public Advocate Bill de Blasio, is unknown outside New York City and until recently not well known inside it.

from The Great Debate:

Can federal charges be brought against Zimmerman?

By William Yeomans
July 23, 2013

Now that a Florida jury has found George Zimmerman not guilty of second degree murder and manslaughter, people across the nation are demanding federal prosecution. But this public debate has been clouded by misinformation about the possibility and scope of federal charges.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Zimmerman: A trial that was all about race

By Nicholas Wapshott
July 14, 2013

Will George Zimmerman’s trial for the killing of Trayvon Martin and the all-too predictable acquittal change anything?

from Tales from the Trail:

Election shines light on long path to post-racial America

November 8, 2012

So much for post-racial.

Supporters watch as U.S. President Barack Obama celebrates his re-election during his election night rally in Chicago, Nov. 7, 2012. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Supporters watch as U.S. President Barack Obama celebrates his re-election during his election night rally in Chicago, Nov. 7, 2012. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

from Unstructured Finance:

Diversity on Wall Street, or a lack thereof

March 30, 2012

By Matthew Goldstein

The shooting death of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teen in Florida, has evoked a lot of debate about race in America and the nation’s attitudes to what it means to be a minority.

from MacroScope:

America’s poverty trap tightens its grip

December 21, 2011

U.S. poverty is becoming increasingly concentrated both geographically and racially, according to a new study from the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. The authors find that while the poverty rate has moved up and down in a relatively narrow range over the last 40 years, mostly mirroring the ups and downs of the economy, that a deeper look at the data reveals some disturbing trends.