from Cancer in Context:

MD Anderson Cancer Center: Grand Central Station with fewer words, more emotions

September 26, 2013

It’s noon and the lobby in the main building of the MD Anderson Cancer Center is buzzing. My appointment is over and I’ve got nothing to do. Houston's heat is too much for a walk outside, so I linger.

from Photographers' Blog:

A visit to Fukushima Ground Zero

February 22, 2012

By Issei Kato

“This day finally came.”

That was my first impression when I was chosen as a pool photographer on behalf of foreign media based in Japan to visit the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

from Photographers' Blog:

Tragedy in Fukushima: when can we go back to home again?

February 13, 2012

After covering myself from head to toe in protective clothing in the hope of protecting me from radiation, I went to accompany evacuees who were temporarily allowed to visit their homes in the 20 km no-entry zone surrounding the tsunami-crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant, a place now notorious for its radiation leaks.

from Photographers' Blog:

Fukushima’s invisible fear

January 31, 2012

By Issei Kato

These days, a mask, protective clothing and radiation counter have all become a usual part of reporting trips, as essential as a camera, lenses and a laptop. Soon, this situation will have gone on for a full year.

from Photographers' Blog:

Invisible snow

August 19, 2011

Invisible Snow from Reuters Tokyo Pictures on Vimeo.

When the Fukushima nuclear power plant exploded, I was in Fukushima covering people who had evacuated from their houses near the plant, as they underwent radiation checks as authorities isolated those who had showed signs of exposure.

from Photographers' Blog:

Beefing up radiation checks

July 27, 2011

Since covering the Fukushima nuclear crisis in March, I have photographed various radiation scenes in the months that followed.

from Photographers' Blog:

Chernobyl graves

May 13, 2011

Every year Orthodox Christians in Belarus throng to local cemeteries to commemorate their deceased relatives and loved ones on the ninth day after Easter, following an ancient Slavic rite on a revered day called Radunitsa. They tidy up tombs and adorn them with wreaths, and bow their heads in somber silence.

from Photographers' Blog:

Japan’s nuclear crisis and my life

April 13, 2011

As a Reuters photographer, I have covered many disasters and incidents over the last ten years but these things had little direct affect on my life. Just like the saying: “The photographer must be taken out of the picture”, I was a third party in most of these cases. By and large, those catastrophes had nothing to do with my personal life. Once my assignment was over, I used to go back to my normal life and switch from emergency mode.

from Russell Boyce:

Asia – A Week in Pictures, March 27, 2011

March 28, 2011

Japan continues to dominate the file from Asia with new photograhers rotating in to cover the twists and turns of this complex and tragic  story.  In a country were the nation rarely buries its dead, the site of mass graves is quite a shocking scene to behold. Holes the length of football pitches are dug in the ground with mechanical digggers and divided into individual plots by the military and are then filled with the coffins of the victims of the tsunami. Family members come to weep and pray over the graves. Some are namless and marked only with DNA details, others bear the names of the victims. There is not enough power or fuel to cremate the thousands of bodies that are being recovered from the disaster zone. 

from The Great Debate:

The cantankerous effects from Japan’s radiation

By Devra Davis
March 16, 2011

JAPAN-QUAKE/

Devra Davis, PhD, MPH, president of Environmental Health Trust, is an award-winning scientist and writer on environmental health issues, author of "The Secret History of the War on Cancer," and "Disconnect" who served as the founding director of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology at the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, 1983-93. The opinions expressed are her own.