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from Environment Forum:

Amazon’s drought, seen from space

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AMAZON/DROUGHTHow green is the Amazon?

Not as green as it used to be, as shown in an analysis of satellite images made during last year's record-breaking drought.

Because greenness is an indication of health in the Amazon, a decline in this measurement means this vast area is getting less healthy -- bad news for biodiversity and some native peoples in the region.

What does a drop in the greenness index look like? It looks gold, orange and red in a graphic accompanying an article to be published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters:

Gray areas are the norm, based on a decade of satellite observations that cover every acre (actually every square kilometer) on the planet. Dots that are gold, orange or deep red show areas with a decrease in greenness. Scientists call this the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI on this chart) or the greenness index.530983main_NDVI_JAS_2010_full_1

from Reuters Investigates:

Weird weather and the Amazon

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As scientists from around the world gather in Cancun for the latest U.N. conference on climate change, Stuart Grudgings reports from Caapiranga, in the heart of the Amazon rainforest, for his special report "Weird weather leaves Amazon thirsty."

This year's drought in the Amazon was the kind of thing experts call a "once in a century" event. Unfortunately, it was the second one in five years.

from Environment Forum:

The Green Gauge: Sinar Mas under fire

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An aerial view is seen of a cleared forest area under development for palm oil plantations in Kapuas Hulu district of Indonesia's West Kalimantan province

Indonesia's Sinar Mas came under heavy fire last week from non-government organization Greenpeace as a report named and shamed some of its biggest clients for their role in the destruction of rainforest and peatlands.

Following is a breakdown of the companies that made headlines July 3 to 16 for winning or losing credibility based on environment-related activity, led by Indonesian conglomerate Sinar Mas.

from Environment Forum:

Better Than A Rainforest? Air Capture Climate Technology Gets A Closer Look

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It sounds almost too good to be true: new technology that would be better than carbon neutral -- it would be carbon negative, taking more climate-warming carbon dioxide out of the air than factories and vehicles put in. It's called air capture technology, and Reuters took a look at some promising versions of it on October 1.

This technology is expected to help some of the world's poorest countries capitalize on any global carbon market, which would put a price on carbon emissions and let rich companies that spew lots of carbon buy carbon credits from poor companies and countries that emit less. The least developed countries emit very little carbon now. But the way the carbon market is set up under the Kyoto Protocol, this puts them at a disadvantage. If you don't emit a lot it's tough to get access to financing and clean technology under the current rules.

from Environment Forum:

The Amazon, the Pyramid and the Eiffel Tower

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The Amazon rainforest lost trees and plants in a 2005 drought -- shedding carbon equivalent to the weight of 140,000 Eiffel Towers or almost 200 Great Pyramids of Giza.

The drought, one of the worst in the past century, revealed the forest's unexpected vulnerability to shifting rainfall and a huge role in releasing greenhouse gases -- compounding problems such as logging and land clearance to create farmland.

from FaithWorld:

Pope says saving heterosexuality like saving the rainforest

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Pope Benedict took an unconventional approach today to stand up to what he sees as gender-bending, saying protecting heterosexuality was as important as saving the rainforest. (Photo: Pope Benedict addresses the Curia, 22 Dec 2008/Max Rossi)

"(The Church) should also protect man from the destruction of himself. A sort of ecology of man is needed," the pontiff said in a holiday address to the Curia, the Vatican's central administration."The tropical forests do deserve our protection. But man, as a creature, does not deserve any less."

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