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Reuters blog archive

from Good, Bad, and Ugly:

A non-prophet organization?

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Pope: Governments must protect minority Christians

IRAQ/He made reference to last week's murder of Salman Taseer, the Muslim governor of Punjab province and an outspoken liberal, who was gunned down for opposing the law, which imposes a death sentence for those who insult the Prophet Mohammad.

I've just noticed recently that Reuters is following in the footsteps of AP and AFP in designating the Islamic prophet Mohammad as "The Prophet Mohammad".

I as a Christian don't consider him my prophet, and neither do, I'm sure, Jews, atheists, Hindus, Buddhists, etc.

Why then have all the mainstream news outlets decided to treat us all as if we are Muslims?

from Good, Bad, and Ugly:

Where are my comments?

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Pope John Paul nears sainthood, to be beatified

POPE-JOHNPAUL/BEATIFICATIONSee the attached documents and please explain why my comments are inappropriate. I have informed the truth as it could be.

L.P.F.

You're asking why your comments on this story didn't make it online? We get that from a number of readers, and usually there is a very good reason.

from Tales from the Trail:

Obamas make rare church visit

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Margaret Chadbourn of Reuters reports the following on the Obama family's church visit.

President Barack Obama , his wife Michelle, and their two daughters made a rare visit to a Washington church service on Sunday and were promptly invited by the pastor to become members of the congregation.Obama_family

from Good, Bad, and Ugly:

Galileo and the Bible

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God was behind Big Bang, universe no accident: Pope

ITALY-GALILEO/VATICAN CITY (Reuters) - God's mind was behind complex scientific theories such as the Big Bang, and Christians should reject the idea that the universe came into being by accident, Pope Benedict said on Thursday.

Benedict and his predecessor John Paul have been trying to shed the Church's image of being anti-science, a label that stuck when it condemned Galileo for teaching that the earth revolves around the sun, challenging the words of the Bible.

from FaithWorld:

Family Research Council to issue “Index of Family Belonging and Rejection”

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Indices are all the rage these days. In his recently published and thought-provoking "Why the West Rules -- For Now," historian Ian Morris has created an "index on social development" which, among other things, attempts to measure the West and East's "energy capture."

There are of course plenty of other examples (and future historians will no doubt see it as a sign of our times -- as Morris notes, ages get the "thought they need"). The latest addition to this swelling modern family of indices will come on Wednesday when the conservative, Washington-based Family Research Council (FRC) releases its  first annual "Index of Family Belonging and Rejection." The index is a product of its Marriage and Religion Research Institute.

from Good, Bad, and Ugly:

The wrong church?

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gbu wrong churchCould you please correct the picture posted with this article?

The picture is of the Holy Trinity Ukrainian Orthodox Cathedral of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Canada, which in no way is connected to the story.

As a prominent landmark of Winnipeg, our Cathedral should in no way be associated with this article.

from FaithWorld:

Germans more negative towards Muslims than other Europeans

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germany (Photo: Anti-Muslim campaign posters by a far-right party in North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW) state, with slogans saying  'Ban minarets - also for NRW' and 'Vote pro NRW - Stop Islamisation', in Bonn, April 23, 2010/Wolfgang Rattay)

Only about one third of Germans think positively of their Muslim neighbors, a much lower proportion than in other western European countries, according to a new poll published on Thursday. In contrast, 62 percent of Dutch and 56 percent of French people responding to the TNS Emnid survey indicated they had positive attitudes toward Muslims.

Detlef Pollack, a Muenster University sociologist who led the study, attributed Germans' views to their lack of contact with Muslims compared to people in other nations surveyed. "The more often you meet Muslims, the more you view them as generally positive," he said.

from UK News:

A priest’s guide: How to Swim the Tiber Safely

About 50 Church of England priests opposed to the consecration of women as bishops are expected to be in the first wave of Anglicans to take up an offer by Pope Benedict and convert to Rome. The traditionalist priests will be joined by five bishops and 30 groups of parishioners, in a structure called an ordinariate, or a Church subdivision, in the new year.

About 300 priests switched in the early 1900s when women were ordained as priests. Then they did not have the comfort of moving over in groups, and nearly 70 returned to the Anglican fold.

from FaithWorld:

Support for UN vote against defaming religion wanes

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ungaA U.N. General Assembly committee has once again voted to condemn the "vilification of religion" but support narrowed for a measure that Western powers say is a threat to freedom of expression. The non-binding resolution, championed by Islamic states and opposed by Western countries, passed by only 12 votes on Tuesday in the General Assembly's Third Committee, which focuses on human rights, 76-64 with 42 abstentions. (Photo: United Nations General Assembly  in New York September 24, 2010/Keith Bedford)

Opponents noted that support had fallen and opposition increased since last year, when the Third Committee vote was 81-55 with 43 abstentions. The 192-nation General Assembly is expected to formally adopt the measure next month.

from FaithWorld:

A review of Christian-Muslim conflict and a modest proposal to counter it

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conflict 1At a Christian-Muslim conference in Geneva this week, participants agreed to build a network for "peace teams" to intervene in crises where religious differences are invoked as the cause of the dispute. The idea is that religious differences may not be the real problem in a so-called religious conflict, but rather a means to mobilise the masses in a dispute that actually stems from political or economic rivalries. (Photo: Coffins of two of 52 killed in al-Qaeda-linked attack last Sunday on a Baghdad church, 2 Nov 2010/Thaier al-Sudani)

If outside experts could help disentangle religion from the other issues, the argument goes, that could help neutralise religion's capacity to mobilise and inflame, in the hope of leading to a de-escalation of the crisis.

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