Archive

Reuters blog archive

from Good, Bad, and Ugly:

He wasn’t the president yet…

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Mitt Romney's French education

The small church in the Bordeaux suburb of Talence looks the same today as it did in the late 1960s, when Romney and fellow missionaries were photographed in front of it during a rare visit by then LDS church president, Howard Hunter.

In this article you mention that Mitt Romney was in a photograph in the late 1960's "during a rare visit by then LDS church president, Howard Hunter".

In the late 1960's, Howard Hunter was a high ranking church official - a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles", but was not the President of the Church. He was called to the position of church president much later.

The reason I know this is because I served a mission for the LDS church at about the same time as Mitt Romney (1967-69), but in a different country. In spite of this minor error, I thank you and its author for this informative, interesting and unbiased article.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Today’s reading is from Shooteronomy

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It's been a few weeks since I've written about any new signs of that onrushing Apocalypse, so I foolishly thought things might be getting better.

Let's see here. Roman Catholic bishops in Wisconsin are urging their parishioners not to bring weapons TO CHURCH, now that a new law permits state residents to carry concealed firearms and electric weapons such as stun guns or tasers.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

This train is bound for glory, this train

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Whoa! Did you see that, Clancy? Looked like Pope Benedict on that train that just went by!

Nah, it couldn't have been, Lamar.That's an express and the Pope takes the local.

from FaithWorld:

Many U.S. Catholics have independent streak – survey

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A majority of American Roman Catholics feel strongly about the sacraments and traditional church values such as caring for the poor, but they may not agree with the church teachings on topics such as abortion, same-sex marriage and maintaining a celibate, male clergy, a survey has found.

The "Catholics in America" survey of Roman Catholics published by the National Catholic Reporter found 86 percent said Catholics can disagree with aspects of church teaching and still remain loyal to the church.

from Photographers' Blog:

Two sides of a living God

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By Navesh Chitrakar

Born and raised in Kathmandu's Newar community I am familiar with Lord Ganesh. His elephant head attached to a human body makes him easy to identify. Ganesh is honored at the beginning of rituals and ceremonies as we celebrate religious festivals.

This month, I had the opportunity to take pictures of Living God Ganesh after I asked one of my friends who was close to the living god's family. I was pleased and surprised that the family was willing to accept me since they don’t normally allow pictures to be taken.

from Photographers' Blog:

The view from a volcanic edge

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By Dwi Oblo

I’ve known about the annual Hindu Kasada Festival for some time now.

For years, I've been planning to go but for the past two there have been conflicting events that I needed to cover so this was my first time attending the festival. As I wanted to provide extensive coverage, I decided to arrive a day before the festival started. Along with four colleagues, I headed to Mount Bromo from Yogyakarta. It took us nine hours to drive the 500 km (310 miles) route.

On the morning of August 15, the sunshine slowly warmed me as it reached 16 degrees Celsius (60 degrees Fahrenheit). Coming from Yogyakarta, this was cold for me.

from Photographers' Blog:

Strange assignment: Buddhists and lobsters

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By Brian Snyder

Every story and photograph that goes out on the Reuters wire has a 'slug,' which is a short, one or two word way of coordinating  and categorizing pictures and stories.  For example, photographs from a Red Sox baseball game are slugged BASEBALL.   But the slug for a recent story I photographed, BUDDHISTS/LOBSTERS, combined two words I never thought I would see together.

Reporter Lauren Keiper and I recently joined a group of practicing Buddhists in Gloucester, Massachusetts for a ceremony to release over 500 lobsters back into the ocean.   The ceremony coincided with the Buddhist holiday "Chokhor Duchen" or "Wheel Turning Day."  Buddhists believe animal liberation helps them live longer, especially when performed on holidays when they believe the consequences of their actions are multiplied.  The lobsters, which would have otherwise been headed to restaurants, were bought at a local wholesaler.

from FaithWorld:

Iran-born writer “kills” ayatollah in novel

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A general view of Iran's late leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini's shrine with pictures of him and Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei in Tehran

GIJON, Spain - Nairi Nahapetian gets her own back on the Iranian regime which forced her into exile by writing a novel about the murder of a powerful religious leader.

from FaithWorld:

Russia’s Muslim Chechnya to ban energy drinks

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Russia's Muslim Chechnya region is planning to ban the sale of non-alcoholic energy drinks such as Red Bull to under 18s, saying they are un-Islamic and dangerous, health officials said.

The ban would be the latest restriction from authorities in Chechnya, where shops can only sell alcohol during a small morning time frame, eateries are shut during the Ramadan fasting month and women must wear headscarves in state buildings.

from FaithWorld:

Hillary Clinton seeks to smooth Islamic defamation row with OIC

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(U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) Secretary General Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu (L) in Istanbul July 15, 2011/Murad Sezer)

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton agreed with a major global Islamic organization on Friday to pursue new ways of resolving debates over religion without resorting to legal steps against defamation. Clinton met Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu, the head of the 57-nation Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC), in Istanbul to help set up new international mechanisms both protect free speech and combat religious discrimination around the world.

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