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from India Insight:

Markets this week: ITC, Infosys top Sensex losers

By Sankalp Phartiyal and Ankush Arora

Brokers trade on their computer terminals at a stock brokerage firm in Mumbai May 13, 2014. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui/FilesThe benchmark BSE Sensex fell in three of five sessions this week, as higher crude prices hurt sentiment and the cabinet’s decision to delay a hike in gas prices disappointed investors. Caution also prevailed ahead of the June derivatives’ expiry on Thursday and fears of more violence in Iraq prompted investors to pare positions.

A Reuters poll on Thursday forecast the 30-share Sensex hitting 27,750 points by the end of December, following a brief correction after the budget.

For the week, the BSE Sensex ended 0.02 percent lower. Investors are now awaiting the new government’s first budget on July 10.

While investors remain hopeful of a pre-budget rally, the progress of the ongoing monsoon is key. Monsoon rains, which continue to be below average, are expected to revive early next month.

from MacroScope:

India share bulls running mainly on hope, well ahead of peers

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Indian stocks have rallied sharply over the last two months, soaring to record highs, although the bull run that began with expectations that Narendra Modi will become the country's next Prime Minister may soon run out of road.

India's top equity index, the BSE Sensex, was trading over 24,850 on Tuesday, having shot up over 10 percent since mid-April alone, when polling began, despite economic growth languishing below 5 percent, along with high inflation and interest rates.

from Expert Zone:

Interest rates likely to remain high

(Rajiv Deep Bajaj is the Vice Chairman and Managing Director of Bajaj Capital Ltd. The views expressed in this column are his own and do not represent those of Thomson Reuters)

The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) raised its benchmark repo rate by 25 basis points to 8 percent at its policy review meet in January. The reverse repo rate rose to 7 percent while the bank rate and marginal standing facility rate climbed to 9 percent. This is the third hike in repo rate since RBI Governor Raghuram Rajan assumed office in early September.

from India Insight:

Banking stocks surge in September; analysts cautious

After falling for four consecutive months, India's banking stocks have surged in September on value buying and recent measures announced by the new Reserve Bank of India chief, but analysts remain cautious.

On his first day in office, RBI chief Raghuram Rajan announced measures to prop up the rupee and liberalise the banking system, including higher overseas borrowing limits for lenders and simpler branch opening processes.

from Expert Zone:

How to rescue the falling rupee

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

I can’t predict where the rupee will eventually land and I don’t think anyone else can either.

Of course, we are not the only country at the mercy of the dollar because almost every emerging market is suffering. But surely, that shouldn’t be any consolation.

from MacroScope:

Why is the Reserve Bank of India so quiet on the rupee?

 

When nobody's listening, sometimes it pays to shout from the rooftops.

Based on the rupee's daily pasting, the Reserve Bank of India might do well to look to the European Central Bank's strong verbal defense of the euro just over a year ago.

In July last year ECB President Mario Draghi declared he would do "whatever it takes" to safeguard the euro's existence.

from Global Investing:

Tapping India’s diaspora to salvage rupee

What will save the Indian rupee? There's an election next year so forget about the stuff that's really needed -- structural reforms to labour and tax laws, easing business regulations and scrapping inefficient subsidies. The quickest and most effective short-term option may be a dollar bond issued to the Indian diaspora overseas which could boost central bank coffers about $20 billion.

The option was mooted a month ago when the rupee's slide started to get into panic territory but many Indian policymakers are not so keen on the idea

from Expert Zone:

Sooner the better for RBI to unwind grip on liquidity

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Reuters)

The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) wasn't expected to do anything new at its policy review on Tuesday and it did exactly that. But the markets still reacted adversely. The stock market moved in consort with the rupee with the Sensex falling 245 points.

It is generally true that markets overreact, more so in India, partly because market sentiment is affected far too quickly. What evoked these sentiments was the undue concern expressed by RBI Governor Duvvuri Subbarao about external uncertainties, more so about quantitative easing by the U.S. Federal Reserve and food inflation in India.

from India Insight:

Tracking Sensex: L&T top loser this week

By Aditya Kalra and Sankalp Phartiyal

The Sensex lost 2 percent and the Nifty slipped 2.3 percent in a tough week for stocks as Indian markets remained cautious ahead of the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) policy review on July 30.

The benchmark Sensex, which ended in the red for three of five trading sessions, touched a 2-1/2 year high during the week as consumer goods shares surged.

from Expert Zone:

Hard currency status a wishful dream for the rupee

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

A hard currency is one that is globally accepted as an exchange currency for trade. It is also expected to remain less volatile in the short term and indicate long-term stability through its purchasing power. The perceived strength and confidence in a currency is also a function of its country’s political milieu, fiscal and trade balances, the policy of its central bank and future economic outlook.

Let us look at all these parameters in the context of the Indian rupee and see where it stands on its journey towards acceptance as a hard currency.

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