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from Expert Zone:

Indian hedge funds get knocked down but get up again

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(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

The fortunes of hedge funds focused on India continue to twist and turn, with many plots and subplots. After witnessing widespread losses and heavy redemptions in 2008, Indian hedge fund managers bounced back remarkably to post a 50 percent return in 2009. They continued their good form in 2010, delivering healthy gains of 12 percent during the year.

But in 2011, the managers witnessed losses amid declining markets and a depreciating rupee. At the end of that year, many managers expressed confidence in the underlying market for the following year and predicted gains for the rupee by mid-2012 -- both these predictions came to pass. The Eurekahedge Indian Hedge Fund Index was up 13.13 percent in 2012, making it the strongest regional hedge fund mandate for the year. Some of the funds even witnessed asset inflows in 2012 and early 2013, a rarity for Indian hedge funds since the financial crisis.

As such, Indian hedge fund managers started this year with their tails up, armed with strong returns and positive global investor sentiment. The managers witnessed healthy returns in January, helped by a rally in underlying equities as foreign investors poured more cash into Indian stocks. And just when you thought the sector was out of the woods, the positive run ended -- most managers witnessed losses in February and March, finishing the first quarter in the red.

Investor reaction to the 2013-14 Budget was not very supportive, given that it did not include significant infrastructure development announcements. The second quarter was worse as the rupee declined, further adding to market losses suffered by managers. July and August witnessed a continuation of the negative streak, as the Reserve Bank of India’s (RBI) measures to support the rupee further hurt investor sentiment.

from Global Investing:

Emerging equities: out of the doghouse

Emerging stocks, in the doghouse for months and months, haven't done too badly of late. The main EM index,  has rallied more than 11 percent since its end-August troughs, outgunning the S&P 500's 3 percent rise in this period. Bank of America/Merrill Lynch strategist Michael Hartnett reminds us of the extreme underweight positioning in emerging stocks last month, as revealed by his bank's monthly investor survey.  Anyone putting on a long EM-short UK equities trade back then would have been in the money with returns of 540 basis points, he says.

Undoubtedly, the postponement of the Fed taper is the main reason for the rally.  Another big inducement is that valuations look very cheap (forward P/E is around 9.9 versus a 10-year average of 10.8) .

from Global Investing:

Pakistan, Nigeria, Bulgaria… the cash keeps coming

The frontier markets juggernaut continues. Here's a great graphic from Bank of America/Merrill Lynch showing the diverging fund flow dynamic into frontier and emerging equity markets.

What it shows, according to BofA/ML  is:

Frontier market funds with year-to-date inflows of $1.5 billion have decoupled from emerging markets ($2.1 billion outflows year-to-date)

from Global Investing:

Will gold’s glitter dim in India?

Indians have reacted to the latest gold prices falls by --- buying more gold. And why not? Aside from Indians' well known passion for the yellow metal (yours truly not excluded) gold has by and large served well as an investment: annual returns over the past five years have been around 17 percent, Morgan Stanley notes.

Now, gold's near 20 percent plunge this year has wiped some $300 billion off Indians' gold holdings, Morgan Stanley estimates in a note (households are believed to own about 15,000 metric tonnes of gold). So is the gold rush in India over?

from Global Investing:

Dollar drags emerging local debt into red

Victims of the dollar's strength are piling up.

Total returns on emerging market local currency bonds dipped into the red for the first time this year, according to data from JPMorgan which compiles the flagship GBI-EM global diversified index of domestic emerging debt. While the EMBI Global index of sovereign dollar debt has already taken a hit the rise in U.S. yields, local bonds' problems are down to how EM currencies are performing against the dollar.

JPMorgan points out that while bond returns in local currency terms, from carry and duration, are a decent 1 percent, that has been negated by the 1.3 percent loss on the currency side. With the dollar on the rampage of late  (it's up almost 4 percent in 2013 against a grouping of major world currencies) that's unsurprising. But a closer look at the data reveals that much of the loss is down to three underperforming markets -- South Africa, Hungary and Poland. These have dragged down overall returns even though Asian and Latin American currencies have done quite well.

from Global Investing:

Making an Impact may be new good

If the pure pursuit of greed is no longer good in the post-crisis world, what defines the new "good"?

That's when you start to consider "Impact Investing", a type of investment that pursues measurable social and environmental impacts alongside a financial return.  According to a report prepared for the Rockefeller Foundation, approximately 2,200 impact investments worth $4.4 billion were made in 2011.

from Global Investing:

U.S. Treasury headwinds for emerging debt

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Emerging bond issuance and inflows have had a strong start to the year but can it last?

Data from JPMorgan shows that emerging market sovereigns sold hard currency bonds worth $9.6 billion last month while companies raised $51.2 billion (that compares with Jan 2012 issuance levels of $17.5 billion for sovereigns and $23.9 billion for corporates). Similarly, inflows into EM debt were well over $10 billion last month, very probably topping the previous monthly record,  according to JPM.

from Global Investing:

Emerging debt vs equity: to rotate or not

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Emerging bonds have got off to a flying start in 2013, with debt funds taking in over $2 billion this past week, the second highest weekly inflow ever, according to fund tracker EPFR Global. Issuance is strong -  Turkey for instance this week borrowed cash repayable in 10 years for just 3.47 percent, its lowest yield ever in the dollar market.

Yet not everyone is optimistic and most analysts see last year's returns of 16-18 percent EM debt returns as out of reach. The consensus instead seems to be for 5-8 percent as  tight spreads and low yields leave little room for further rallies -- average yields on the EMBI Global sovereign debt index is just 4.4 percent.    Domestic bonds meanwhile could suffer if inflation turns problematic. (see here for our story on emerging bond sales and returns).

from Global Investing:

And the winner is — frontier market bonds

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Global Investing has commented before on how strongly the world's riskiest bonds -- from the so-called frontier markets such as Mongolia, Nigeria and Guatemala -- have performed.  NEXGEM, the frontier component of the bond index family run by JP Morgan, is on track to outperform all other fixed income classes this year with returns of over 20 percent., the bank tells clients in a note today. Just to compare, broader emerging dollar bonds on the EMBI Global index have returned some 16 percent year-to-date while local currency emerging debt is up 13 percent.

That appetite for the sector is strong was proven by a September Eurobond from Zambia that was 15 times subscribed. Demand shows no sign of flagging despite a default in frontier peer Belize and shenanigans over the payment of Ivory Coast's missed coupons from last year. Reasons are easy to find. First, the yield. The average yield on the NEXGEM is roughly 6.5 percent compared with  just under 5 percent on the EMBIG.

from Breakingviews:

Hedgies’ star quality is in the eye of investor

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By Neil Unmack
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Hedge fund stars make their clients pots of money, right? If only hedge fund investing was so simple. The truth is that managers with stellar reputations can have poor-performing investors. And the real stars are those who do well on metrics that the industry tends not to disclose.

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