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from Andrew R.C. Marshall:

Reuters Wins Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting

Reuters Wins Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting, Finalist for Investigative Reporting and Breaking News Photography

NEW YORK, April 14, 2014 - Reuters, one of the world's largest multimedia news providers, was today awarded the 2014 Pulitzer Prize in International Reporting. Reuters journalists Jason Szep, Andrew R.C. Marshall and team were honored with the first-ever text Pulitzer Prize to be won by Reuters for their series on the oppression of the Muslim Rohingya of Myanmar.

For two years, Reuters reporters investigated human-rights abuses, bringing the international dimensions of the Rohingya to global attention. As a result of their work, more than 900 people were freed from brutal trafficking rings.

Awarding the prize to Reuters in the International Reporting category, the Pulitzer committee recognized the team for "their courageous reports on the violent persecution of the Rohingya, a Muslim minority in Myanmar that, in efforts to flee the country, often falls victim to predatory human-trafficking networks."

from Photographers' Blog:

News photography – going wider

Photo

London, Britain

By Russell Boyce

Global Editor, News Projects, Reuters Pictures

Sometimes apparently unconnected events turn out to be related in some abstract way, and they get me thinking.

My friend Jennifer O'Neill, the guitarist with a young band named "Bleech" posted a picture on Facebook recently. It read: "a musician is someone who puts £5,000 worth of gear into a car worth £500 to drive 100 miles to earn £50.” It’s a sentiment many young photographers can also relate to in the changing landscape of professional news photography.

from Unstructured Finance:

Tyrone Gilliams fights the law

By Matthew Goldstein

It's been a while since we last wrote about the legal struggles of Tyrone Gilliams, the Philadelphia commodities trader/hip-hop promoter/wannabe reality show star/self-styled preacher, whom federal authorities have charged with scamming investors out of $5 million. But the University of Pennslyania graduate is making news again with the scheduled start of his Jan. 22 criminal trial in New York federal court.

Gilliams will be on trial with his former lawyer Everette Scott. Both men are charged with working together to "devise a scheme and artifice to defraud" investors out of their money that was supposed to have been invested in Treasury Strips--a derivative of U.S. Treasury bonds the separates the coupon and principal on the underlying note into different securities.

from Full Focus:

Photos of the week

Photo

Our top photos from the past week.

from MacroScope:

India inflation consistently tough to pin down

High inflation is a drag on economic growth in the world’s second most populous country and matters immensely to over 400 million people, or over a third of India’s total population, who struggle to earn enough to feed their families three meals a day.

The particularly volatile nature of inflation in India has confounded policymakers and small business owners and has left economists, who are often running complex statistical models based on a dearth of reliable data, with a poor forecasting record.

from Deepti Govind:

India inflation consistently tough to pin down

High inflation is a drag on economic growth in the world’s second most populous country and matters immensely to over 400 million people, or over a third of India’s total population, who struggle to earn enough to feed their families three meals a day.

The particularly volatile nature of inflation in India has confounded policymakers and small business owners and has left economists, who are often running complex statistical models based on a dearth of reliable data, with a poor forecasting record.

from The Observatory:

The science of performance

Does sex diminish athletic vigor? Does athletic tape enhance it? These are just a few of the questions that one Reuters correspondent has sought to answer amidst the toil, tears, and sweat at the Summer Olympics in London.

Kate Kelland, who covers health and science news in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa for the wire service, has been on the performance beat since the opening ceremony, digging into the latest research on what might pump up or deflate an athlete’s game. Doping is the first thing that comes to mind, of course, and Kelland has had a number of posts on the matter.

from Anthony De Rosa:

Why is @Reuters yelling at me?

We conducted a survey of our @Reuters followers recently, and asked them this:  sometimes the Reuters wire publishes alerts in ALL CAPS, usually when the news is urgent.  Should we run them in uppercase and lower case on Twitter, as we would for normal conversation? What is more important?

The answer choices were: a) Receiving accurate news quickly even if that news is delivered in an "all caps" tweet or b) I’d like news to be reformatted from "all caps" before being sent, even if it takes longer.

from Saqib Ahmed:

Twitter is not the enemy

1 picture = 1,000 words

1 tweet = 1,000 stories?

It's the question mark that vexes the world's biggest news organizations. They have discovered how important Twitter is to news, but have become increasingly worried about how it's changing the way that they gather and report information. The result has been to clamp down on journalists' Twitter use when they could do just the opposite.

Sky's decision that its reporters should not retweet information that has "not been through the Sky News editorial process" and the BBC's policy to file copy into its newsroom as quickly as possible -- rather than sending a tweet -- are among the latest responses by traditional media houses to the perceived threat. But Twitter is not a threat as long as mainstream media can avoid worrying about it.

from Anthony De Rosa:

News agencies must evolve or meet extinction

Imagine you're a reporter and you suddenly witness a major news event occurring right before your eyes. Do you snap it to the wire, file a story to your website, or tweet it out to your followers? If you're at the AP, you damn well better not choose the latter.

In a perfect world, you'd want to do all the above, though your employer is going to likely want you to do the first two before you tweet. Today, Reuters is a lot more than just a wire service. We've built -- and are continuing to build -- what we think is the world's greatest news website, in the form of Reuters.com, and part of that is providing our readers with reliable and timely news, information, opinion and analysis.

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