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from The Great Debate UK:

D-Day Dispatch: The first reporter on the beach

"I have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty and skill in battle. We will accept nothing less than full Victory." Dwight D Eisenhower, D- DAY – June 6, 1944

 

<em>"Since before daybreak, bombers and fighters had cascaded their cargoes on German gun emplacements and pillboxes, scoured the skies for the Luftwaffe and probed ahead for tactical targets. This was war in its totality, theatrical and terrifying. The greatest combined operation in history was underway and this time, I was not just in the stalls but on the stage."</em>Doon Campbell, Reuters correspondent, ‘Magic Mistress – A 30 year affair with Reuters’</p><p> 

"Since before daybreak, bombers and fighters had cascaded their cargoes on German gun emplacements and pillboxes, scoured the skies for the Luftwaffe and probed ahead for tactical targets. This was war in its totality, theatrical and terrifying. The greatest combined operation in history was underway and this time, I was not just in the stalls but on the stage."Doon Campbell, Reuters correspondent, ‘Magic Mistress – A 30 year affair with Reuters’

Seventy years ago, the Normandy landings, which began on D-Day ( June 6, 1944), marked  the beginning of the end of the Second World War. Codenamed  ‘Operation Neptune’, the Allies, under the supreme command of U.S. General Dwight D Eisenhower, regained a foothold in Western Europe. Many months would pass before Hitler committed suicide, but from this moment, the days of his ‘Third Reich’ were numbered.

Born with only half a left arm, Doon Campbell (pictured above), one of the Reuters D-Day correspondents, was ineligible to join the British forces. But with a name like ‘Doon’ he was almost predestined to opt for the next best thing – the ‘Boys Own Adventure’ career of a War Correspondent. At 24 years-old, he was not only the youngest British war correspondent covering the invasion, he was also the first reporter to set foot on the Normandy beaches with the sea-borne force.

from Jack Shafer:

In today’s news, one size fits all

newsroom

Whenever editors want to impose their will on a newsroom -- be they editors at newspapers, magazines, news wires, websites, or TV programs -- they dictate a memo for distribution to their journalists noting that stories have gotten too long and instructing everybody to write shorter. It's a frequent request, as editors come to believe that their reporters aren't listening to them or are openly defying their requests to file more succinct copy. In recent days, top editors at my outlet, Reuters, sent such a memo, asking writers in the Americas to diet their copy down to between 300 and 500 words. So did a top editor at the Associated Press, who set similar goals for his reporters and editors. Inspired by these bold moves, I'm sure that editors all over America have typed up their own shorter-is-better memos and are pressing send right now. (The Reuters memo says the call for short copy is nothing new -- it's in the Reuters Handbook. The AP says it's responding to requests of its members, who don't have time to edit copy down.)

The strong preference for short over long probably dates back to the invention of moveable type: The costs of printing make page-space scarce and hence very valuable. The shorter you make each story, the more stories you can pack into the available space, and theoretically this leads to an informed and satisfied reader. Some editors preach for shorter stories because they think that’s the way to get the boring stuff out of the way. In the contemporary era, the leading proponent of the short stuff was Al Neuharth, the auteur of Gannett Co.'s USA Today. "A maximum of facts in a minimum of words," was Neuharth's founding formula in 1982, and "making reporters out of essayists" was his method.

from Photographers' Blog:

Instagram – a platform for professionals?

London, United Kingdom

By Russell Boyce

Global Editor, News Projects, Reuters Pictures

Two amazing pictures showed up on my screen over the past few days. The first was from Myanmar, where a Rohingya Muslim woman was pictured holding her malnourished twins. The second captured a deadly explosion in Iraq.

Both were sent out to our clients on the newswire, and I decided to share them on social media. First I posted them to Twitter, with links to Reuters.com slideshows and our Wider Image website. The people who follow us on Twitter know what to expect – breaking news pictures from around the globe including some images that are quite brutal.

from Andrew R.C. Marshall:

Reuters Wins Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting

Reuters Wins Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting, Finalist for Investigative Reporting and Breaking News Photography

NEW YORK, April 14, 2014 - Reuters, one of the world's largest multimedia news providers, was today awarded the 2014 Pulitzer Prize in International Reporting. Reuters journalists Jason Szep, Andrew R.C. Marshall and team were honored with the first-ever text Pulitzer Prize to be won by Reuters for their series on the oppression of the Muslim Rohingya of Myanmar.

from Photographers' Blog:

News photography – going wider

London, Britain

By Russell Boyce

Global Editor, News Projects, Reuters Pictures

Sometimes apparently unconnected events turn out to be related in some abstract way, and they get me thinking.

My friend Jennifer O'Neill, the guitarist with a young band named "Bleech" posted a picture on Facebook recently. It read: "a musician is someone who puts £5,000 worth of gear into a car worth £500 to drive 100 miles to earn £50.” It’s a sentiment many young photographers can also relate to in the changing landscape of professional news photography.

from Unstructured Finance:

Tyrone Gilliams fights the law

By Matthew Goldstein

It's been a while since we last wrote about the legal struggles of Tyrone Gilliams, the Philadelphia commodities trader/hip-hop promoter/wannabe reality show star/self-styled preacher, whom federal authorities have charged with scamming investors out of $5 million. But the University of Pennslyania graduate is making news again with the scheduled start of his Jan. 22 criminal trial in New York federal court.

Gilliams will be on trial with his former lawyer Everette Scott. Both men are charged with working together to "devise a scheme and artifice to defraud" investors out of their money that was supposed to have been invested in Treasury Strips--a derivative of U.S. Treasury bonds the separates the coupon and principal on the underlying note into different securities.

from Full Focus:

Photos of the week

Our top photos from the past week.

from MacroScope:

India inflation consistently tough to pin down

High inflation is a drag on economic growth in the world’s second most populous country and matters immensely to over 400 million people, or over a third of India’s total population, who struggle to earn enough to feed their families three meals a day.

The particularly volatile nature of inflation in India has confounded policymakers and small business owners and has left economists, who are often running complex statistical models based on a dearth of reliable data, with a poor forecasting record.

from Deepti Govind:

India inflation consistently tough to pin down

High inflation is a drag on economic growth in the world’s second most populous country and matters immensely to over 400 million people, or over a third of India’s total population, who struggle to earn enough to feed their families three meals a day.

The particularly volatile nature of inflation in India has confounded policymakers and small business owners and has left economists, who are often running complex statistical models based on a dearth of reliable data, with a poor forecasting record.

from The Observatory:

The science of performance

Does sex diminish athletic vigor? Does athletic tape enhance it? These are just a few of the questions that one Reuters correspondent has sought to answer amidst the toil, tears, and sweat at the Summer Olympics in London.

Kate Kelland, who covers health and science news in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa for the wire service, has been on the performance beat since the opening ceremony, digging into the latest research on what might pump up or deflate an athlete’s game. Doping is the first thing that comes to mind, of course, and Kelland has had a number of posts on the matter.

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