from FaithWorld:

Jordan amasses evidence for claiming Jesus baptism site

May 7, 2009

bethany-pool-2 (Photo: Bethany baptismal pool with ruins of ancient basilicas in rear, a staircase to the water and, at right, two of the four massive pillars that used to hold a church above the baptism site, 6 May 2009/Tom Heneghan)

In John's Gospel, verse 1:28, it says that John the Baptist used to baptise people in "Bethany beyond the Jordan" and Jesus went there for his own baptism. Seen from the perspective of Jerusalem, "beyond the Jordan" means on the river's east bank, in present-day Jordan. Those words were added to distinguish that Bethany from the village near Jerusalem where Jesus was said to have raised Lazarus from the dead. Despite that, pilgrims have long visited a spot on the river's west bank, now in an Israeli military zone in the Palestinian territories, and considered it the true site where Jesus was baptised.

from FaithWorld:

Obama, the inaugural prayer and U.S. culture war

By Reuters Staff
January 17, 2009

President-elect Barack Obama hopes to reach across the political divide, but the uproar over the preachers at his inauguration celebrations show just how wide some of those divisions are in America, our Dallas correspondent Ed Stoddard writes in a pre-inaugural analysis.

from FaithWorld:

GUESTVIEW: Obama inauguration: An interfaith invocation to answer the critics

By Reuters Staff
January 17, 2009

The following is a guest contribution. Reuters is not responsible for the content and the views expressed are the author’s alone. The author is Program Director at the Interfaith Center of New York. He is writing a book about Interfaith and Civil Society.

from FaithWorld:

Did Saddleback “faith quiz” cross church-state divide?

August 20, 2008

John McCain, Rick Warren and Barack Obama at Saddleback Civil Forum, 17 August 2008/Mark AveryDid Rick Warren's Saddleback Civil Forum with John McCain and Barack Obama violate the separation of church and state? Was it right for a pastor to ask U.S. presidential candidates about their belief in Jesus Christ or their worst moral failures? Will the success of the Saddleback Civil Forum mean that major televised interviews or debates about faith will become a regular fixture in American political campaigns?