from The Great Debate:

When political compromise is suspect

By Bill Bishop
January 7, 2013

The odds are that the extremely close national election wasn’t close at all in the place where you live.

from The Great Debate:

A mandate to help the middle class

By John Podesta
November 26, 2012

The focus in Washington has now shifted to the fiscal cliff, with the White House and Congress, particularly the House Republicans, staking out negotiating positions on the expiring Bush tax cuts and the looming budget sequester.

from The Great Debate:

To see future electorate, look at California voters now

By Sherry Bebitch Jeffe and Douglas Jeffe
November 20, 2012

The changing face of the American electorate is etched all over the map of California. The Golden State may no longer be a partisan battleground, but it continues to be a reliable bellwether for the evolving national political landscape.

from The Great Debate:

The end of white affirmative action

By Charles Postel
November 16, 2012

ILLUSTRATION: MATT MAHURIN

Former GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney said in a Wednesday conference call to donors that President Barack Obama won re-election because he promised “big gifts” to voters, “especially the African-American community, the Hispanic community and young people.” Romney singled out healthcare reform as a “huge” gift to these voting blocs and the working poor.

from Chrystia Freeland:

Obama, the super-rich and the election

By Chrystia Freeland
November 9, 2012

Among the losers in the United States this week are the super-rich, who spent unprecedented millions to evict President Barack Obama from the White House. The investing class turned sharply and vociferously against the president many of them had supported in 2008. On Tuesday night, the plutocrats lost their shirts.

from The Great Debate:

Fighting off the counterrevolution

By Bill Schneider
November 9, 2012

The conventional wisdom has arrived: 2012 was a status quo election.  President Barack Obama was reelected.  Democrats continue to have a majority in the Senate.  Republicans still control the House.  Only two states changed their presidential votes from 2008 to 2012 (North Carolina and Indiana).  Six billion dollars were spent and almost nothing changed!

from Lawrence Summers:

The ‘Obama debt’ fallacy

By Lawrence Summers
November 5, 2012

Writing on behalf of the Romney campaign, my friend Mike Boskin has responded to my column from last week that argued that in a number of areas of economic policy, President Obama has the superior vision. Boskin condemns what he refers to as “Obama debt” and argues that Governor Romney has a better plan that he asserts offers "a superior alternative of balanced budgets.” While I was not writing on behalf of the Obama campaign and my piece had a much broader focus than budget deficits, several responses are appropriate.

from The Great Debate:

It’s the (lack of) unity, stupid!

By Bill Schneider
November 5, 2012

What we expect to hear in the closing days of a campaign is a call to arms.  Instead, what we're hearing from both sides is a call to disarm.

from Photographers' Blog:

A different political film

November 2, 2012

By Jim Young

The political game always seems the same to me, only the players change.

This is my third Presidential campaign and I have always been fascinated with U.S. politics. This time around it was the early impact of the Tea Party and Sarah Palin, all the way to Romney's run up to election day that intrigued me.

from The Great Debate:

Vote is referendum on the New Deal

By Neal Gabler
November 2, 2012

 

We have been told throughout this presidential campaign that the contest is a referendum about two visions of government, one activist, the other passive ‑ like every presidential election since 1980. But that may actually understate the stakes. In a larger context, it is a choice between maintaining the last 80 years of American governance or abruptly ending it.