from India Insight:

Short skirts, bad stars, chow mein: Why men in India rape women

October 30, 2014

Demonstrators from All India Democratic Women's Association (AIDWA) hold placards and shout slogans during a protest against the recent killings of two teenage girls, in New Delhi May 31, 2014. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

The 2012 Delhi bus rape case and an ever-longer list of rapes and murders in India have prompted politicians and public figures in India to cite plenty of implausible reasons why rape happens and why men brutalise women or portray women in ways that suggest they had it coming. Many people, when speaking out, tend to minimise the crime or rationalise it in ways that sound ludicrous to many. We created this list of such comments more than a year ago, but it seems like it's time to add some new entries.

from John Lloyd:

Modi: Democrat or divider

By John Lloyd
April 9, 2014

India’s 815 million voters started the five-week voting cycle earlier this week. It’s already being celebrated as a triumph just for taking place -- “the largest collective democratic act in history,” according to the Economist.

from India Insight:

Interview: Narendra Modi has marginalized his own party – Jairam Ramesh

By Reuters Staff
November 5, 2013

By Frank Jack Daniel, Jo Winterbottom and Mayank Bhardwaj

Jairam Ramesh, the rural development minister in the Congress-led government, told Reuters on Tuesday that Narendra Modi's career reminded him of the rise of the Third Reich, the strongest comments yet by a minister of his rank on the Bharatiya Janata Party leader.

from FaithWorld:

Factbox – Swami Ramdev, India’s most popular yoga guru

By Reuters Staff
June 2, 2011

(India's yoga guru Swami Ramdev speaks during a yoga camp in the northern Indian town of Haridwar April 8, 2010/Jitendra Prakash)

from Reuters Editors:

Link economy and journalism

By Chris Ahearn
July 23, 2010

chris_ahearnThe following is a guest column by Chris Ahearn, President, Media at Thomson Reuters.

from Commentaries:

Google’s real-time challenge

September 24, 2009

In its latest venture round last week, Twitter was valued at $1 billion. The Wall Street Journal calculated that $2.7 billion would be a fair value. Robert Scoble, an influential tech blogger -- and habitual enthusiast -- reckoned somewhere between $5 billion and $10 billion was justified. That's for a company with no revenues and no known business model.