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from India Insight:

Tendulkar exits, Anand slips during emotional 2013

Sachin Tendulkar bid a teary-eyed farewell to cricket while contemporary Viswanathan Anand lost his world chess crown in an emotional year for Indians in sports.

Forty-year-old Tendulkar, statistically the greatest batsman ever, walked into the sunset in November after his 200th test at his home Wankhede Stadium brought the cricket-crazy nation to a standstill.

"My life's been 22 yards for 24 years. It's hard to believe that wonderful journey is coming to an end," an emotional Tendulkar said during a moving farewell speech as most Indians on and off the ground battled to hold back tears.

His phenomenal success on the cricket field and impeccable lifestyle off it made him a perfect role model for India's burgeoning youth population.

from Left field:

Tendulkar’s retirement a boon not a bane

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While Sachin Tendulkar’s retirement may have been looked upon as the saddest chapter in Indian cricket, the fact remains that his exit can only work to the benefit of MS Dhoni’s emerging Test side.

There is no doubt about Tendulkar’s contribution to Indian cricket but as statistics show his impact was on the decline, more so in the last two years.

from Left field:

Importance of being Sachin Tendulkar

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For 24 years Sachin had been India's happiness index.

If a common man, while wading through the struggles of his daily life, smiled, it was mostly when Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar took guard for India. All that has come to an end with his retirement.

India may never find another sporting icon who singularly succeeded in making the nation forget its faults - a unifying factor of rare stature. No player, in contemporary cricket, has evoked spells of pure joy with his craft and conduct for so long - 24 years. Life, for the nation of a billion people, will go on but never be the same again.

from India Insight:

Sachin Tendulkar: What his peers said over the years

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By Sankalp Phartiyal and Aditya Kalra

Sachin Tendulkar's 200th test match, against West Indies at the Wankhede Stadium, will also be his last as the 'Little Master' brings the curtain down on a glittering 24-year cricket career at the age of 40. (Click here for main story)

Here’s a look at how Tendulkar’s peers on the cricketing field have described him over the years:

from India Insight:

Documentary captures Indian cricket’s lesser-known faces

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Prithvi Shaw is 14 and looks like any other schoolboy at first glance. But those who have seen him wield a cricket bat call him India's next Sachin Tendulkar. They say he's as natural and as powerful in his stroke play as the world's most famous batsman was at that age. Shaw started playing when he was three, going up against people more than twice his age.

"He was shorter than the stumps he used to bat in front of," Shaw's father said.

from Left field:

Life in the time of Federer and Tendulkar

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In sports, the fear of loss does different things to different people. It spurs athletes to greater heights; for spectators, it often changes the topography of their nails. In some, it induces mild depression.

Its inevitability is creeping into the minds of even the most stoic spectators. Soon, they won't have Roger Federer and Sachin Tendulkar around anymore. What will be the world like without Federer and Sachin? Surely, the sporting world will move on, for no athlete is bigger than the game. But will it be the same again? Maybe not. Federer brought to tennis a "complete game", rarely seen before. What made it even surreal was the ease and elegance with which he wielded his racquet.

from Left field:

Domination in ODIs a thing of the past

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Recent results in one-day cricket have not only made a mockery of the rankings but it has also injected some much-needed excitement in the format.

First, it was current No. 1 India, who lost to Pakistan (No. 6) at home, followed by third-ranked Australia, who fought hard to just level a series with visitors Sri Lanka. Then it was the turn of hosts South Africa to lose a three-match series to lower-ranked New Zealand.

from India Masala:

Ferrari Ki Sawaari: Would you please hurry up?

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Towards the end of Rajesh Mapuskar's "Ferrari Ki Sawaari", as the protagonist and his son are re-united and embrace each other, cry and wipe the tears off each other's cheeks, an onlooker hesitantly asks "aap jaldi karenge zara?" (would you please hurry up?). It might sound like an insensitive thing to say, but perhaps that is what someone should have said to Mapuskar as he went about making this film.

Perhaps he might have restrained himself from writing a convoluted and at times contrived script that seems to stretch on for longer than its 2 hour 15 minute duration.

from India Insight:

Sachin Tendulkar: from Wankhede to parliament

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So it's just a matter of time, according to media reports, before Sachin Tendulkar swaps his India jersey for starched white and walks into the Rajya Sabha.

While the clamour was growing to honour him with the Bharat Ratna, the country's highest civilian award, few expected him to be nominated to the upper house.

from The Great Debate (India):

Congratulate Sachin Tendulkar

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Sachin Tendulkar is the first cricketer to score 100 international centuries, reaching the long-awaited milestone during the Asia Cup one-dayer against Bangladesh.

Since his 1989 Karachi debut, what the 38-year-old has accumulated is much more than scoring almost 34,000 international runs from 188 test matches, 462 one-dayers and one T20 international.

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