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from India Insight:

Investors fear for their deposits after Sahara chief’s arrest

The arrest of Sahara chief Subrata Roy last week and the court case over an outlawed bond scheme are raising fears among some investors who worry they will not get their money back.

One of them is Anil. The 30-year-old travel agent put his 200,000 rupees ($3,276) in another investment scheme offered by Sahara, which bills itself as "the world’s largest family." He fears that the case could hurt his investment.

"I have told my agent to surrender my deposit [partially] ... I am worried, but my money will come back, my agent has said," Anil told India Insight, declining to give his last name. "I will hesitate a bit to invest any money now. If the court case goes on, I will redeem all my Sahara investments."

Roy, the 65-year-old head of the Sahara conglomerate which has business interests from shopping malls and life insurance to finance and real estate, was sent to Delhi’s Tihar Jail on Tuesday. Police arrested him after his company failed to comply with a Supreme Court order in 2012 to repay investors in the bond scheme, which the court has said was illegal.

from India Insight:

A look at some of India’s cheap food schemes

Nearly 70 percent of India’s population lives on less than $2 (around 120 rupees) a day, according to World Bank data. The country, the world’s second-largest producer of wheat and rice after China, is also home to a quarter of the world's hungry.

Helping the poor has always been on the ruling government’s agenda since independence. India, which currently spends 900 billion rupees on giving the poor access to cheap food, hopes to increase it to 1.3 trillion rupees ($22 billion) and widen its scope with an ambitious food security programme launched this month.

from The Great Debate:

Why final salary schemes are bad for you

REUTERS -- Neil Collins is a Reuters columnist. The views expressed are his own --

So you'd like to work for BP? A fine company, recognisably the same business as half a century ago, and likely to be around in half a century's time -- yup, it's a fine choice for a career.

It's going to be an even better one for the ambitious twenty-something, because no-one joining after next March will be able to join its final salary scheme.

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