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from Tales from the Trail:

Obama focus on policy, not polls – White House

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The White House is downplaying several new polls showing President Obama's job approval ratings plunging to new lows along with rising public concern over high unemployment and the sluggish economy.

"The president is focused on the measures he can take...  to address the urgent need to grow our economy and create jobs; to deal with the fact that economic growth is not fast enough and that job creation is not substantial enough," White House spokesman Jay Carney said at Tuesday's press briefing when asked how concerned Obama is about the poll numbers.

An NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll shows Obama's overall job approval rating at a low of 44 percent, down 3 percentage points since July.  More than half of Americans  now disapprove of Obama's job performance and one in three say they're worse off financially since he's been in the White House, according to an ABC News/Washington Post poll. And a poll by Politico and George Washington University shows 72 percent of voters believe the country is heading in the wrong direction.

Asked what Obama would say to people who feel worse off now than before he took office, Carney said the president
would tell them: "He fully understands the anxiety that is out there among the American people about the economy, the frustration at the pace of growth, the frustration at the pace of job creation. And that's why he feels it is so urgent to take action now and not to simply say, oh, well, we shouldn't do anything and then let it all be decided next year after an election.

from Tales from the Trail:

Washington Extra

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In the name of equal opportunities, after featuring Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell on Monday, today’s newsletter leads on his Democratic counterpart Harry Reid.
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Reid, our Reuters-IPSOS poll reveals, has two big problems as he aims for re-election in recession-hit Nevada in November. The first is the economy, the overriding concern of three out of every four registered voters – a proportion way higher than the national average.

The second is the enthusiasm gap, a problem for Democrats all over the country, with Reid’s supporters significantly less likely to vote than the Republican rank and file. Reid is comfortably ahead of Tea Party darling Sharron Angle among registered voters, by 52 to 36 percent. Among people who said they were likely to vote, the gap narrowed sharply, with Reid leading by just 48 to 44 percent.

from Tales from the Trail:

Washington Extra

mcconnell1Democrats have been trying to portray Republicans as the "Party of No". Today Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell visited the Reuters bureau in DC and argued there was no shame in saying no.

Republicans, he said, will be campaigning against many of the policies enacted by President Barack Obama, including healthcare reform, higher spending, bailouts and greater government intervention in the economy, things the party was "proud" to say no to.

from Tales from the Trail:

McConnell sees 2012 presidential race wide open, no Republican heir apparent

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Who will lead the Republican Party in the 2012 presidential race?

USA/Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell says plenty of Republicans will throw their hat into that ring, especially if Democratic President Barack Obama's popularity stays on the low side.

What about Sarah Palin? The Tea Party favorite appears to be positioning herself for a possible run -- she's endorsing candidates in this year's midterm elections and taking on Democrats when there's an opening.

from The Great Debate:

Keep the charitable tax deduction

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 Diana Furchtgott-Roth– Diana Furchtgott-Roth, former chief economist at the U.S. Department of Labor, is a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute. —

The economy is in a painful slump. Growing numbers of people need help, charities are facing a decline in donations and states are cutting back on services. The April employment report from the Labor Department will show a further increase in the number of unemployed.
Yet, rather than harnessing the generosity of Americans to help out, President Obama has proposed to reduce the tax incentives for charitable giving. He wants Congress to limit to 28 percent the tax saving from contributions for taxpayers who itemize their deductions.

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