from Photographers' Blog:

Catastrophic lessons in a quake zone

April 25, 2013

Ya'an, Sichuan province, China

By Jason Lee

It was 8:02 am on April 20th, 2013, three weeks before the fifth anniversary of the 2008 Sichuan Earthquake which killed nearly 70,000 people, when another strong quake hit the city of Ya’an in the same province. More than 190 people died, 21 others are still missing, and more than 11,000 people have been injured.

from Changing China:

China: Green or Gray?

December 4, 2009

                   

As Copenhagen's climate talks draw near, more and more critics are turning to the world's biggest emitter of greenhouse gases and asking how much damage has been done and what is being done about it?

from Photographers' Blog:

Walking with survivors: Audio slideshow

June 16, 2008

Shanghai-based photographer Nir Elias tells of his hike with survivors of the Sichuan quake.

from Photographers' Blog:

Aftermath of a quake: Audio slideshow

June 16, 2008

A showcase of David's Gray images of the aftermath of the Sichuan earthquake are set to music in this audio slideshow.

from Photographers' Blog:

Earthquake in China – a view from Beijing

June 3, 2008

It happened and it just happened, quietly but tangibly ...  it only lasted 5 seconds...
 
May 12, 2008, 2:28 pm on the button, I was stooping to pick up a gift before rushing off to visit a client with two colleagues. The sudden dizzy feeling made me mentally rebuke myself for skipping breakfast and lunch; in those 5 seconds, I swore to myself never to do it again if I had to attend a formal meeting. But of course, my expressions remained calm. 
 
"It's an earthquake", a sharp yet clear voice from the corner of the office broke this temporary silence which instinctively ignited my relief of being faint. "Hey buddy, maybe you are not so bad", I said to myself.
 
So, that is how it started ... on a normal working day, it just happened.
 
No worries, we had already had contingency plans...
 
Photographers immediately  rushed to the airport, we skipped the client visit and began to tackle the breaking story. From that moment, for the first time ever, the Beijing Pix Desk began running 24/7 with three editors: Grace Liang, Reinhard Krause and myself.
 
The first pictures of white collars wandering downstairs after escaping from a shaking Beijing office building hit the wire 10 minutes after the quake struck while we continued moving pix from around China showing general damage like burst water pipes and cracked walls.  

from Photographers' Blog:

Covering the quake: Audio slideshow

May 30, 2008

David Gray recounts his experience covering the earthquake that devastated Sichuan province, China.

from Photographers' Blog:

Aftershocks and other earthquake experiences

May 28, 2008

1. Departure

May 12, 2:28 pm, almost all my Reuters Beijing colleagues saw the office TV sets shaking. Those TV sets had often shown the news but it was the first time they themselves had been the news. Within a few seconds, we realized it was an earthquake. An 8.0 magnitude earthquake had hit Sichuan province. Sichuan! My home. About ten minutes later, I was driving my car to Beijing airport. At that moment, I did not even know that there was a place on this earth called Wenchuan. Where was I going? What time could I leave? Fortunately, I was the first Reuters journalist to arrive at the airport and unfortunately I was the last to leave as I chose to fly to Chengdu and its airport was closed. I had almost no idea how serious the situation there was but wisely as it turned out took two instant DC/AC power inverters which meant I could work normally in the firs few days when the whole area was completely out of power.

from Changing China:

A tale of two stadiums

May 28, 2008

Evacuated people rest at a sports stadium which was turned into a temporary shelter in MianyangThis weekend, Beijing inaugurated the new Bird's Nest Stadium with the "Good Luck Beijing" track and field event. I attended less than 24 hours after covering the earthquake in Sichuan, and the contrast between sports and rubble was a little hard to digest.

from Changing China:

The earthquake and the Olympics

May 27, 2008

A soldier carries out relief work as a Beijing Olympics countdown board is seen in the background after an earthquake in BeichuanThe tenor of China's Olympic year changed dramatically over the past two weeks.

What had been a building crescendo of celebration and national pride turned into an outpouring of grief and support for the earthquake-hit province of Sichuan.

from Changing China:

Disaster in Sichuan

May 21, 2008

Earthquake damage in Dujiangyan

I was one of the first foreign reporters on the scene after a devastating earthquake hit the southwestern Chinese province of Sichuan on May 12.