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from Photographers' Blog:

Super lucky, Super moon

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By Darryl Webb

I guess you could call me a lunatic. Not in a bad way, really... I’ve just always been taken with the full moon. So when the “Super Moon” was making this year’s debut I knew I was going to try to get an image of it, despite having to be late to two of my best friends' 50th birthday parties. I knew they would understand as they know my passion for my work.

The Friday before I had planned to do a little scouting of the moon to see where it was going to rise but missed it by an hour due to the Farmer’s Almanac not knowing that Arizona doesn’t do daylight savings time. That put a little wrinkle in my plans but I still scouted out locations and found one next to the Phoenix Zoo.

Since I knew the park and that it frequently has visitors on top of it, my hope was to get people up on a butte possibly with the moon in the background. But, when I tried shooting from there I was too close. I got a couple of test frames off, but I knew I could do better if I was further back. That was my plan for Super Moon Saturday.

Despite having somewhat of a game plan, I thought about what else represents Arizona and the saguaro cactus came to mind. So that morning my wife and I packed up the dogs and headed 50 miles out of the city to the desert looking for a possible sea of cactus where the moon might rise above or through them. Unfortunately and fortunately I never found that vantage point. Mother Nature began scattering the sky with clouds and I thought my chances were fading fast.

from Saqib Ahmed:

Twitter is not the enemy

1 picture = 1,000 words

1 tweet = 1,000 stories?

It's the question mark that vexes the world's biggest news organizations. They have discovered how important Twitter is to news, but have become increasingly worried about how it's changing the way that they gather and report information. The result has been to clamp down on journalists' Twitter use when they could do just the opposite.

Sky's decision that its reporters should not retweet information that has "not been through the Sky News editorial process" and the BBC's policy to file copy into its newsroom as quickly as possible -- rather than sending a tweet -- are among the latest responses by traditional media houses to the perceived threat. But Twitter is not a threat as long as mainstream media can avoid worrying about it.

from Reuters Soccer Blog:

Football still offside in attitude to women

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The British media furore over two television presenters’ sexist comments over a lineswoman at a Premier League match at the weekend has thrown the spotlight on the subject of women in soccer – be it on the pitch or off.

Sky Sports duo Richard Keys and Andy Gray have apologised for saying female officials “don’t know the offside rule” when they were talking about lineswoman Sian Massey at Saturday’s match between Wolves and Liverpool when they thought their microphones were switched off.

from The Great Debate UK:

Should major sporting events be reserved for free-to-air TV?

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Steven Barnett-Steven Barnett is professor of communications at the University of Westminster and has written extensively about the Sky deal and cricket for the Wisden Cricketers’ Almanack. The opinions expressed are his own.-

David Davies’ review panel on UK sport’s “crown jewels” – the list of sporting events which have to be reserved for free-to-air television – has proposed adding significantly to the existing list of 10 events.

from Reuters Editors:

Are we now too speedy for our own good?

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Last week I was told that Reuters has lost its ethical bearings. You've sacrificed the sacred tenet of accuracy by rushing to publish information without checking if it is true. Your credibility has suffered, the value of your brand will wither and the service you offer to clients has been devalued, I heard.

It was a meaty accusation, especially as it came in the midst of a debate on ethics in journalism held at the London home of ThomsonReuters, the parent of the Reuters news organisation. The charge came from former Reuters journalists and a senior member of the trustees body that monitors Reuters compliance with its core ethical principles.

from The Great Debate UK:

Are we now too speedy for our own good?

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[CROSSPOST blog: 9 post: 10723]

Original Post Text:

Last week I was told that Reuters has lost its ethical bearings. You've sacrificed the sacred tenet of accuracy by rushing to publish information without checking if it is true. Your credibility has suffered, the value of your brand will wither and the service you offer to clients has been devalued, I heard.

It was a meaty accusation, especially as it came in the midst of a debate on ethics in journalism held at the London home of ThomsonReuters, the parent of the Reuters news organisation. The charge came from former Reuters journalists and a senior member of the trustees body that monitors Reuters compliance with its core ethical principles.

from Commentaries:

Put the Ball into ITV shareholders’ court

Tony Ball is one of the most talented executives in British television. He must be, because ITV, the country's biggest commercial broadcaster, is prepared to offer him a pay package which could make him 20 million pounds over five years.

Unfortunately, Ball thinks that 30 million would be nearer his true value. Oh, and by the way, he doesn't think much of the turkeys on the ITV board either. He has a point. Executive chairman Michael Grade has done almost everything in television and entertainment except to make it pay. George Russell brings all his experience at Northern Rock and the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust to bear as deputy chairman. The senior independent director is James Crosby, who ran HBOS onto the rocks of the banking crisis.

from Commentaries:

Counter-Revolution?

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FoxTVRupert Murdoch used News Corp's fiscal fourth quarter conference call on Wednesday to say he wants to be paid ANYTIME his news is read online. Perhaps he was just in a cranky mood, but most of the reporters listening to the call thinks he's going beyond what he's said many times before on the topic.

The digital revolution has opened many new and inexpensive methods of distribution, but it has not made the content free. Accordingly, we intend to charge for all news websites.

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