Archive

Reuters blog archive

from Breakingviews:

Review: Rebooting banking – with Google’s help

 By Dominic Elliott

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Brett King may be, as his own author’s note claims, “the foremost global expert on retail banking innovation.” But his latest book is let down by an excess of acronyms and gushing advertorial.

“Breaking Banks” largely reproduces a series of interviews that King conducted in the last 12 months on his internet radio programme.  This Socratic approach can be illuminating, but it encourages King to slip into jargon. Within two pages, King uses six acronyms - EPS, NACHA, EMV, NFC, POS and ACH - with little explanation.

A grating penchant for self-publicity and a careless attitude towards non-specialists risk obscuring many important insights. Prime among these is that smartphones are changing retail banking for good. In 2009, former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker quipped that the only useful financial innovation in the last 25 years was the ATM. But King reels off a host of companies that are already providing customers with better banking tools.

from The Great Debate UK:

The Great Sleep Debate

Not that long ago everyone was lamenting the slovenliness of the British public. We didn’t work hard enough, took too many holidays and anxiety was rising about how we would ever keep up with our harder-working, more productive peers in China and the East. However, the tides is changing and, guess what, slovenliness is back.

Slovenliness is not quite accurate, but these days we can’t read a paper without being told that we need to get more sleep, be more mindful, take better care of ourselves and quit our technology addictions. Apparently, our need to tweet, check email and watch the latest Game of Thrones is literally killing us. Experts from Harvard, Cambridge and Surrey Universities have put together a report on humans and our need for sleep, and have come to the conclusion that we are arrogant to ignore our circadian rhythms.

from Expert Zone:

Leveraging the digital revolution

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

We live in an age where emerging technologies are narrowing the divide between humans and machines. As features of mobile phones become more customized and complex, they cease to be just devices of communication. Mobile phones now store more personal information than ever before. They are increasingly being perceived as personalized devices that enhance our lives.

We are also living in times when remote robotic surgeries and online classrooms are transforming healthcare and education in ways never imagined before. We are truly living in a digital age.

from Breakingviews:

One idea Samsung could safely copy from Apple

By Una Galani

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Here’s one idea that Samsung could safely copy from Apple. As a proportion of its $221 billion market capitalization, the South Korean giant’s near $40 billion cash pile is almost as big as that of its U.S. arch rival. With reserves accumulating fast, it can afford to mimic Apple by giving more to investors.

from Breakingviews:

BlackBerry washout leaves a white-collar stain

By Rob Cox
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The dawn of the new millennium brought a gadget like no other. More than a cellphone, the BlackBerry offered users something novel in the blossoming age of email: liberation from the desk. This made it the device of choice for a rich and mobile class, eventually spawning an aspirational market beyond Wall Street. Fittingly, BlackBerry’s demise is occurring with the device as little more than a mark of white-collar servitude.

from Breakingviews:

Xiaomi can’t afford to let its hype go to waste

By John Foley

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Xiaomi has poached one of Google’s top executives – but can it steal Silicon Valley’s tech crown? The Chinese smartphone maker already outsold Apple’s iPhone in the Chinese market in the second quarter of 2013. Its valuation has ballooned from $4 billion to $10 billion in a year, based on a recent capital increase. Hiring former Googler Hugo Barra will fuel the hype; Xiaomi shouldn’t waste it.

from Breakingviews:

Apple patent case exposes trade arbiter’s flaws

By Reynolds Holding
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

 

A patent ruling against Apple exposes serious flaws with America’s trade arbiter. A U.S. ban on imports of older iPhones and iPads is a big win for rival Samsung - and yet another example of the International Trade Commission being too quick to block products on dubious grounds. President Barack Obama has proposed tightening ITC standards. He could start by nixing this decision.

from Expert Zone:

The road to smart technology

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

The Sixties witnessed the world’s first major technology wave with the rise of the mainframe, which had a dramatic impact on business processes and continues to do so even now. The second wave was the rise of the mini-computer, which had ease of use and was affordable. The third has been the PC, which needs no introduction, and the Internet is the fourth.

The Internet has changed the way business is conducted across the world and has had an impact on how we work, shop, socialise and interact. And now smart mobile technology really does look set to be the fifth major technology wave. What is of even greater interest is that we may be looking at a technology growing faster than any other in history. It took landlines nearly 100 years to reach saturation. Mobile technology reached saturation within 20 years and smartphones are set to do so in less than 10.

from Breakingviews:

Google shooting blanks in smartphone patent wars

By Reynolds Holding
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Google is shooting blanks in the smartphone patent wars. Buying Motorola Mobility and its cache of inventions was meant to shield the search giant’s Android operating system from legal attack. But judges and regulators are defusing the patent arsenal, saying the underlying technology must be licensed on reasonable terms. While bad for Google shareholders, it’s a bonus for innovation.

from India Insight:

Samsung Galaxy S4 lands on Bangalore, hundreds get in line

By Sayantani Ghosh and Supantha Mukherjee

"I'm very excited. I've been waiting a couple of hours; I couldn't get any sleep last night," said Arif, an employee of UK retailer Tesco. He was near the front of the line of hundreds of people to line up at the UB City Mall in Bangalore to buy the new Galaxy S4 smartphone.

The phone went on sale at the Samsung store on Saturday, and Arif waited for about two hours for the privilege of spending 41,500 rupees, or about $763, on the new model, which comes with a 5-inch screen and 13-megapixel camera, and runs on Google's Android platform.

  •