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from Oddly Enough Blog:

Lady, your chest is ringing…

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Blog Guy, I know you don't care much about the World Cup, but I would sure like to go.

SOCCER-WORLD/So what's stopping you?

Please don't laugh, but I don't know where I would put my cell phone.

I mean, I'd want to take it in case my boyfriend calls, but I'm afraid my purse might get stolen in the stands, and if I put it in my pocket it could fall out when I'm jumping and screaming for the team.

Why don't you just hold it?

Oh, I get way too excited and wave my arms and stuff. It might get lost and then I couldn't talk to my boyfriend if he calls.

What about zipping it up in a fanny pack or something like that?

No, I need to be able to get to it quickly in case...

world cup phone use this one 280Yes, let me guess, in case your boyfriend calls?  I'll  to go through our World Cup photos to see if anybody has any ingenious answer to your problem. Maybe I'll check the fans down in Paraguay - those people are always pretty clever.

from Reuters Soccer Blog:

Donovan leads America to the promised landon

donovanThe following is a guest post by David Henry Sterry, who is co-author of “The Glorious World Cup: A Fanatics Guide, for those who like their soccer with a side of kick ass.” The opinions expressed are his own.



It was do or die today for USA and Algeria. When do you ever get to put “USA,” “Algeria,” and “do or die” in the same sentence? That's what we love about the World Cup. After the draw that was ripped from the jaws of victory by the evil Coulibaly of Mali, everyone from noted Scottish/Berkeley soccer pundit Alan Black to venerable English broadcaster Martin Tyler to American tennis sensation Andy Roddick called the decision a pox on the backside of world soccer.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

This just about clinches it, I’m in hell…

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SOCCER-WORLD/

Hey Blog Guy, let's play a game. What's the very, very worst thing you can imagine doing right now?

Um, I'd have to say, watching that World Cup thing. You know, in person.

Sure, I think most people feel that way, but surely you can be more specific. Say you WERE at the World Cup right now, couldn't it get worse somehow?

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Let’s meet some World Cup fans!

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SOCCER-WORLD/

Blog Guy, you haven't had much to say about the World Cup. Why didn't you go to it and blog from there?

SOCCER-WORLD/Are you kidding me? I know, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that my seat would have been right between these two imbeciles.

from Africa News blog:

Searching for it — not quite feeling it — in Polokwane

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Searching for it -- not quite feeling it -- in Polokwane The fan fest sounded like a wild party with the vuvuzela horns booming through the empty streets of Polokwane town, one of the smallest of 10 venues for the first World Cup on African soil. Everyone must be there, we thought as there was little going on for a Saturday night in the northern South African town. Even the local Nandos restaurant on the main street shut by 8 p.m. But on closer inspection the soccer fan fest -- loud as it was -- was also pretty deserted. Soccer fever has yet to reach Polokwane. A sleepy town of just 500,000 people, it was hard to imagine Polokwane, which means place of safety, would host its first World Cup soccer match in less than 24 hours. In Johannesburg or Cape Town you could definitely "feel it". Here we weren't so sure. Driving through the town's eerily deserted streets searching for a restaurant where we could eat and watch the soccer, we discovered that was not an easy find. It was also hard to imagine what long-term benefit the town would see from being a host city. While for the four matches to be played in Polokwane the few hotels on offer for tourists were full, in between there were plenty of rooms at the inn. No team was staying nearby which would bring with it the paraphenalia of adoring fans or news-hungry media and the associated business. Those playing were flown in for pre-match training, again the day of the match and ferried back straight after. Police closed down the roads near the stadium on the edge of town the night before. But those fearing traffic similar to the four-hour long queues witnessed in Johannesburg trying to get to Soocer City need not have bothered. The streets were empty, the car parks empty and -- just 30 minutes before kick-off -- the stadium was half empty. By the second half, the stands were just about three-quarters full, though the blasts of the vuvuzelas compensated for the missing supporters. The Peter Mokaba stadium almost looked like they hadn't had time to finish painting it, with the stark grey concrete of the outer wall in direct contrast with Soccer City in Johannesburg's brightly coloured exterior. The inside was still coated in construction dust and most of the refreshment stands remained shuttered and closed during the match. Just two hours after the players left we found ourselves the lone figures in a dark stadium struggling to see the keyboard as we tapped out the finishing touches to our stories. Even the name of the stadium was controversial. Mokaba was the African National Congress (ANC)'s youth league leader who, like his current counterpart Julius Malema, was fond of the phrase "Kill The Boer," which upset many Afrikaners. Ironically there's not even a local soccer team to make use of the sparkling pitch. Residents said the Rai Stars disbanded long ago and the nearby promising Black Leopards team are based more than 150 kilometres away in a less than World Cup standard stadium. <http://www.blackleopardsfc.com/10_stadium_info.htm> The Dynamos train 100 kilometres away. Neither team play in the country's top league. "You can't help thinking this huge stadium will just be derelict and empty in a few years time," said one hotel worker.

Polokwane StadiumThe soccer fan fest sounded like a wild party with the vuvuzela horns booming through the empty streets of Polokwane town, one of the smallest of 10 venues for the first World Cup on African soil.

Everyone must be there, we thought as there was little happening on a Saturday night in the northern South African town centre.

from Shop Talk:

World Cup is no March Madness in sapping productivity

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cup1It may be the World Cup, but when it comes to sapping productivity in the United States the global soccer tournament still has a thing or two to learn from March Madness and the National Football League.

Outplacement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas, which often measures lost workplace productivity, said many U.S. fans will tune in for the quadrennial soccer tournament, which kicks off Friday in South Africa, but the event still trails the NCAA men's basketball tournament, dubbed March Madness, and other events.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

“Hurt Locker” soccer?

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BRITAIN/

Blog Guy, I don't know how I'm going to get through all this World Cup stuff. I'm already so bored by soccer. How about you?

Which kind are you talking about?

beckham 2 260There are different kinds of soccer?

Sure. There's regular soccer, and then there's that new Extreme Soccer, like they play in war zones and places like that.

from Photographers' Blog:

Fans, fire and fury

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Fenerbahce's hopes of winning the Turkish league title for the 18th time were all resting on the final round of games in the 2009-2010 Super League. Expectations among their fans were high, with the major Istanbul club knowing a win at home against Trabzonspor was enough to clinch the championship.

Second-placed Bursaspor were one point behind Fenerbahce on 72 points and faced the tough prospect of a match against last year's champions Besiktas. Some 50,000 Fenerbahce fans wearing navy blue and yellow jerseys took their seats at the Sukru Saracoglu stadium with their attention focused more on celebrating their imminent title triumph than on watching the game.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Did anybody else feel a bump back there?

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Well readers, it's May 20th, time for me to announce the coveted Dumbass of the Month Award. The winner is...

maradona car 1 260Wait, Blog Guy, there are still 11 days to go in May. This hardly sounds fair.

The winner is Argentina soccer coach Diego Maradona, who ran over a cameraman while on his way to name the members of his squad for the World Cup finals.

from Global News Journal:

65 years after WW2 – should Germans still feel guilty?

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Today marks the 65th anniversary of the end of World War Two. No big deal, you might say. And on the GERMANY/surface there is certainly nothing all that extraordinary about May 7, 2010. There has been none of the celebrating that marked the 40th or 50th or even 60th anniversaries.

But what is interesting about this 65th anniversary of the end of the fighting in Europe is that it means every German (and Austrian) born before the war’s end has now reached retirement age. In other words, the entire war-era generation – even those who were infants on V-E Day – is now in retirement. It means all those running Germany now – in government or management, or running factories or driving busses – had, as documented by their birth certificates, nothing whatsoever to do with World War Two.

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