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from Our Take on Your Take:

The difference between winning and losing

Netherlands fans react as they watch the 2010 World Cup final between the Netherlands and Spain on a large screen TV on the streets of the Netherlands July 11, 2010. Your View/Niels de Vries

Spanish supporters flood the streets of Toronto on July 11, 2010, shutting down traffic as they celebrate Spain's win over the Netherlands in the World Cup final. Your View/Susan Kordalewski

Last Sunday's World Cup final between the Netherlands and Spain galvanized fans on either side. Your View contributors Niels de Vries (top) and Susan Kordalewski captured their very different emotions at the outcome.

View this week's Your View showcase here.

from MacroScope:

The octopus and the economists

What do an eight-legged creature in an aquarium in Germany and 74 economists have in common? The consensus view that Spain would claim the World Cup -- until the economists, as they so often do, changed their minds.

worldcup.jpgIf World Cup 2010 goes down as one of the most unpredictable and exciting competitions in recent history, bringing underdogs Holland and Spain to the final showdown, what was hopelessly routine was watching so-called expert opinion converge around the safest bet. At least among financial professionals, who have done so well of late predicting the future.

from Good, Bad, and Ugly:

Polly want a correction?

gbu parrot

“The Netherlands and Spain  will square off Sunday for the World Cup final, the first ever for both  sides.”

On Mani the parrot, who predicts the Netherlands will win the World Cup, your reporter mistakenly, in her voiceover, says this is the first time for each Spain and the Netherlands to be in the World Cup final. That is incorrect. The Netherlands has been in two previous final games.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Couldn’t she just do a floral tribute?

larissa combo 490

Blog Guy, the World Cup is drawing to a close. So who would you say is the big winner so far?

Oh, without a doubt it's model Larissa Riquelme, of Paraguay. Without leaving her hometown, she managed to mug her way into 24 pictures on our  photo file while her country was still a player.

from Reuters Soccer Blog:

Spain’s queen visits locker room, Puyol in towel

Spain's Queen Sofia visited the locker room  after the national team beat  Germany 1-0 in the World Cup semi-final on Wednesday. Most of the players got a heads up and scrambled into their clothes.

SOCCER-WORLD/But no one warned Carles Puyol, hero of the moment, who emerged from treatment on his knee, wearing only a towel. Discomfitted, the Barcelona defender blushed and scurried to hide behind his teammates.

from India Masala:

World Cup mania hits Bollywood brigade

Football fever is taking over the world and Bollywood’s glamorous brigade hasn’t been left untouched.

Football World CupFilm stars like Shah Rukh Khan, Imran Khan and Lara Dutta are either headed to or are already in South Africa to catch a glimpse of football heaven.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

There’s lingerie in Paraguay?

paraguay combo 490

Blog Guy, isn't it cool how Paraguay is hanging in there at the World Cup? How about some pictures of their loyal fans?

SOCCER-WORLDFans? I think there's just the one.

Only one fan? For the whole country?

Apparently. You know that woman I blogged about with the interesting docking station for her cell phone? We've now had ELEVEN photos of her.

from Photographers' Blog:

Samurais in South Africa

I arrived in South Africa with the Japan team filled with excitement and an acute feeling of anxiety. Never mind that I would be on the scene to cover the world's biggest sporting event, and never mind that I would be competing against the top sports photographers from around the globe to get the best pictures. For a Reuters photographer like myself dedicated to a single team, when your team drops out of the competition, you're finished. Like the defeated team, you go back to the hotel, pack your bags and spend the long flight home wondering what went wrong. Based on Japan's lackluster showing in the East Asia Soccer Championship my expectation for Japan was three defeats in a row and no victories. Mine would be a short stay in South Africa.

A Japanese boy living in South Africa reacts as he watches Japan's national soccer team depart from South Africa at O.R. Tambo airport in Johannesburg June 30, 2010. REUTERS/Toru Hanai

But during Japan's first match against Cameroon the Samurai Blue seemed to transform themselves in front of my eyes with Keisuke Honda’s goal being the catalyst. Japan was defeated by the Netherlands in their second match but the Samurais demonstrated the unity of the team in their performance and they were victorious against Denmark in their third match. In doing so they completely wiped out the image that I held of the Japan team before going into the competition. I was covering the world's biggest sporting event, and I was going up against the top sports photographers, but in this World Cup Japan's victory meant that the formidable teams of France and Italy and the even more formidable photographers accompanying them were going home. Not me.

from Reuters Soccer Blog:

England defence crumble in German masterclass

SOCCER-WORLD/

England coach Fabio Capello would do well to take a transcript copy of Germany coach Joachim Loew’s post-match press conference – because in it he would find all the simple reasons why his side were trounced 4-1 and sent packing from the World Cup on Sunday.

In it, Loew rather clinically explained to the international press sat before him that his side were instructed to target John Terry, pull him out of position and pretty much walk into the huge gaps created in England’s snail-paced central rearguard.

from Photographers' Blog:

Looking ahead to England vs Germany

Photographers Dylan Martinez and Kai Pfaffenbach discuss what they expect from Sunday's World Cup match between England and Germany.

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