from Financial Regulatory Forum:

BNP’s ‘huge’ role in undermining U.S. Sudan sanctions behind looming tough penalty, sources say

June 19, 2014
By Brett Wolf, Compliance Complete ST. LOUIS, June 18 - The pivotal role BNP Paribas played in helping Sudan sell oil in violation of U.S. sanctions is the major reason U.S. authorities are pushing for harsh penalties against the French banking giant, two sources with firsthand knowledge of the matter said."BNP basically was the Sudanese economy. They were just huge in helping the government of Sudan evade U.S. sanctions," one of the sources said.BNP’s role involved removing references to Sudanese parties from wire-transfer messages, so U.S. dollar oil payments could clear through New York and move into accounts controlled by Khartoum, the sources said. The sources declined to name the buyers of the Sudanese oil or to say what Khartoum did with the revenue.

from Global Investing:

Certain danger: Extreme investing in Africa

July 12, 2012

The Arab Spring, for all its democratic and political virtues,  put a big economic dent in the side of participating North African countries, particularly when it came to attracting foreign investment in 2011.

from Africa News blog:

South Sudan’s era of prosperity?

July 12, 2012

Many South Sudanese hoped the country's emergence as the world's newest nation would begin an era of prosperity, but the country has remained mired in disputes with its northern neighbour over oil, the border and a many other issues.

from The Human Impact:

Asylum tales: London museum hosts a tour with a twist

June 28, 2012

What connects a brass medallion to Leonardo da Vinci's diary, a Japanese sake kettle and an ornate wooden pulpit that once belonged to the Sultan of Qa'itbay?

from The Human Impact:

Invest in women in conflict zones to promote change

April 3, 2012

Where would you put your money as an investor? A leading campaigner against gender-based violence says there is only one answer - invest it in women in conflict zones.

from Why Nations Fail:

The unending warfare in Africa

By Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson
March 15, 2012

Sierra Leone is not the only African nation that has been ravaged by civil war. They have been all too common, and any explanation for African poverty that does not come to grips with these all-too-frequent civil wars is bound to be incomplete. Though the number and death tolls of African civil wars have been declining, they are still ongoing in many parts of the subcontinent, including in various parts of the Niger Delta, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Sudan, South Sudan, and of course Somalia.

from Global Investing:

The missing barrels of oil

February 24, 2012

Where are the missing barrels of oil, asks Barclays Capital.

Oil inventories in the United States rose sharply last week, with demand for oil products  such as gasoline at the lowest in 15 years and crude stockpiles at the highest since last September. Americans, pinched in the wallet, are clearly cutting back on fuel use.

from Africa News blog:

Dancing to the last beats of a united Sudan

January 25, 2011

sudan.jpg
Half way through the evening you felt this is what a united Sudan could have been like.

from Environment Forum:

Food for thought

January 12, 2011

USA/Feeling hungry? Maybe that's because of all the news, from around the world, about food today -- how much people produce, how much more they need, how much it's going to cost, how much of an effect it will have on climate change, and vice versa.

from FaithWorld:

Bashir plans Islamic law if Sudan splits, defends flogging woman

By Reuters Staff
December 19, 2010

sudan (Photo: Sudan's President Omar Hassan al-Bashir addresses a rally in Gedaref, December 19, 2010/stringer)

Sudan will adopt an Islamic constitution if the south splits away in a referendum next month, President Omar Hassan al-Bashir said on Sunday. The vote on independence for south Sudan is scheduled to start in three weeks and was promised in a 2005 peace deal that ended a civil war between the mainly Muslim north and the south, where most follow traditional beliefs and Christianity.