from The Great Debate:

Militants will always get through for one reason: Money

By David Wise
February 22, 2015

Gunmen gesture as they return to their car after the attack outside the offices of French satirical weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo

French authorities had removed Said Kouachi and his brother Cherif, the gunmen who attacked the Charlie Hebdo offices in Paris (seen at rear), from the intelligence watch list. Still from video in Paris, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Reuters TV

from Breakingviews:

Review: Fixing the CIA – a novel approach

December 26, 2014

By Martin Langfield

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Ian Bremmer:

World Cup chants reveal true state of U.S.-German relations

By Ian Bremmer
July 17, 2014

 Germany's national soccer players acknowledge their fans after their win over the U.S. at the end of their 2014 World Cup Group G soccer match at the Pernambuco arena in Recife

As Germany basks in its World Cup victory, it’s easy to forget that one of the most telling geopolitical moments of the tournament came during the Germany-U.S. game. As American fans chanted “U-S-A! U-S-A! U-S-A!” the Germans countered with, “N-S-A! N-S-A! N-S-A!”

from John Lloyd:

Here’s who should be watching the watchers

By John Lloyd
July 9, 2014

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The files stolen from the National Security Agency by Edward Snowden, the quiet American who has turned the security world inside out, drip out week by week – in The Guardian, on the new website The Intercept, financed by eBay founder Pierre Omidyar, in the German weekly Spiegel and in the Washington Post. The last of these outlets had the latest installment on Monday. It told us that “ordinary Internet users, American and non-American alike” had been swept into the NSA’s computers in far greater numbers than foreigners reasonably suspected of possible terrorist links.

from The Great Debate:

The Republican war cuts through CPAC

By Craig Shirley
March 11, 2014

The 40th annual Conservative Political Action Conference has ended but the harsh debate between the Republican establishment and the Tea Party goes on. Though nothing remains static indefinitely. Things do change.

from The Great Debate:

How the NSA undermines national security

By Eileen Donahoe
March 6, 2014

Questions about the legitimacy and efficacy of the mass-surveillance techniques used by the National Security Agency continue to swirl around the globe. The debate in the United States has mostly focused on a misleading trade-off between security and privacy.

from The Great Debate:

Drones: From bad habit to terrible policy

By Naureen Shah
February 4, 2014

Senator John McCain (R-Ariz.) recently lambasted legislation that may prevent the White House from transferring the lethal drone program from the CIA to the Defense Department. The provision is in a classified part of the bill, so the public may never know what it says.

from The Great Debate:

On NSA, Obama still says ‘trust me’

By Ari Melber
January 17, 2014

President Barack Obama’s speech on Friday on intelligence reform marked a bullish shift in his approach to the National Security Agency.

from The Great Debate:

NSA revelations: Fallout can serve our nation

By Ben FitzGerald and Robert Butler
December 18, 2013

The fallout from the Edward Snowden revelations continues to snowball. With each disclosure, allies, businesses and influential authors call for reform. There is ever growing pressure on the Obama administration to respond and quell these concerns before permanent damage is done.

from Ian Bremmer:

In search of self-aware diplomacy

By Ian Bremmer
November 26, 2013

In 2005, Karen Hughes became George W. Bush’s undersecretary of public diplomacy. Her charge, both poorly defined and ill-timed, was to improve America’s international image in the years after the country had launched two wars. Other countries will side with us and do what we want if only we better explain our point of view, the thinking went, and make them see us as we see ourselves. By the time Hughes left office in 2007, international opinion of the U.S. was no higher than it was when she arrived, according to polls.