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from Photographers' Blog:

Clinging to life in a tsunami zone

By Toru Hanai

Choufuku Ishisone of Miyako, Iwate prefecture, owns a convenience store.

On March 11, 2011, Ishisone was driving to see his store after checking on his house following the earthquake and saw a black tsunami wave roar over a seawall. He made a U-turn, but the tsunami struck him from multiple directions, sending his car afloat. The engine stopped. He jumped out of the car in a hurry but lost his footing in the tsunami and was swallowed up in the thick, black water.

He managed to avoid cars, ships and other debris carried by the tsunami but the water level continued to rise steadily. Grabbing onto a power line pole as he was swept past, he scrambled up so desperately that he was about five meters high before he knew it.

“I want to be saved! That one feeling kept me climbing,” he said. “Then I thought I had to get off the pole somehow, but the water didn’t go down, which was very irritating.”

It began to snow, chilling Ishisone, whose clothes were wet. As some three hours passed and it grew dark with no signs of rescue, Ishisone climbed down the pole and swam to a city office annex building. Finally he thought, “I’m safe.”

from Russell Boyce:

Asia – A week in Pictures March 20, 2011

Japan - after four days of editing pictures from the earthquake and tsunami in Japan I took an hour break to buy some food and get some money in a small shopping centre near the office. As I walked through the busy street, the thought that stuck me was that everything around me is so temporary. The people along the coast of the Miyagi Prefecture were probably going about their daily business, just like I was, when the wall of water swept through their towns wiping their very existence off the face of the earth. Reports of a nuclear cloud heading towards Tokyo where 13 million people live, added to my sense of fear. In my mind,  the world had changed forever. I cannot begin to imagine what the people in Miyagi, the rescue workers and the photographers taking the picture are feeling. From our team of photographers covering the story, I have chosen three pictures from each photographer, not an easy task when there are so many great images. Respect to all the teams covering the story and my condolences to the people of Japan. I will let the pictures speak for themselves.

JAPAN-QUAKE/

A survivor pushes his bicycle through remains of devastated town of Otsuchi March 14, 2011. In the town of Otsuchi in Iwate prefecture, 12,000 out of a population of 15,000 have disappeared following Friday's massive earthquake and tsunami. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

from Fan Fare:

“Amazing Race” stiff-arms “Idol”, again, in Emmy reality show battle

The producers of Fox's  program "American Idol" are likely asking themselves what they need to do on their show to ever beat CBS' series "The Amazing Race" and win the best reality competition trophy at the Primetime Emmys.amazingrace

Singing competition "American Idol" remains the most watched show on TV, and the team behind the show would surely like to cap that accomplishment with an Emmy for the program.

from Fan Fare:

The Emmys: Hosts, hosts everywhere

klumpants.jpgFor the 60th Emmy Awards , the show's organizers made a bold decision to scrap the one-host format typical of awards shows.

Instead, they opted for not one, but five hosts -- the five being Ryan Seacrest of "American Idol," Heidi Klum of "Project Runway," Tom Bergeron of "Dancing with the Stars," Howie Mandel of "Deal or No Deal," and Jeff Probst of "Survivor." All were nominated for the newly-created category award for the best host of a reality or competition series.

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