from The Great Debate:

Why Republicans may not win the Senate after all

By Craig Shirley
September 29, 2014

 Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell speaks at the Faith & Freedom Coalition "Road to Majority" reception in Washington

Establishment Republicans should keep the champagne on ice until after the midterm elections. Too many are already popping corks, pronouncing their strategy of “crushing” the Tea Party during the primaries as a crucial step in their successful takeover of the Senate.

from Stories I’d like to see:

Google’s lost links, U.S. border crossing guards and when a Tea Party loss is a win

By Steven Brill
July 15, 2014

A Google search page is seen through a magnifying glass in this photo illustration taken in Brussels

1. Google’s dilemma:

Writing in the Guardian last week, Google general counsel David Drummond described the trouble the European unit of his company is having trying to implement a European Union court’s decision that the search giant must eliminate links to certain web articles or postings about people that these people claim are unduly embarrassing.

from Reihan Salam:

What Eric Cantor’s loss — and a quirky economist’s win — means for Republicans

By Reihan Salam
June 12, 2014

U.S. House Majority Leader Cantor discusses primary election defeat during news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington

On Tuesday Republican primary voters asserted themselves in spectacular fashion by wresting the GOP nomination from House Majority Leader Eric Cantor and giving it to quirky economist Dave Brat, who now looks very likely to win the seat in the fall. This is much more than a run-of-the-mill primary upset. Because Cantor was second in command to Speaker John Boehner among Republicans in the House, his defeat has set off a scramble for power, the outcome of which has yet to be determined.

from The Great Debate:

What does Eric Cantor’s loss mean? Gridlock until 2023

By Bill Schneider
June 12, 2014

Cantor and Boehner hold a news conference after a Republican Party caucus meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington

Gridlock is likely to rule the federal government until at least 2023.  Why 2023?  Because it may not be until after the 2020 Census that the Democrats have a good chance of regaining control of the House of Representatives.

from The Great Debate:

Meet the Tea Party — European edition

By Bill Schneider
May 27, 2014

schneider combo

Europe finally has its own Tea Party. Or something like it.

Last weekend, citizens of 21 nations elected members of a new European parliament. The result? An outpouring of rage.

from The Great Debate:

How far right can Republicans go?

By Bill Schneider
May 21, 2014

U.S. Senate Republican Leader Senator Mitch McConnell (R-KY) speaks to supporters during a campaign stop at the Lexington Airport in Lexington, Kentucky

The line between the Republican establishment and the Tea Party has blurred.  That spells trouble for the GOP in the long run.  Possibly this year, more likely in 2016.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Fighting for the future of conservativism

By Nicholas Wapshott
May 13, 2014

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron delivers a speech to placard waving Conservatives during an European election campaign rally at a science park in Bristol

Establishment Republicans have been delighted by the victory of Thom Tillis, their favored candidate in last week’s North Carolina primary. After expensive advertising campaigns by establishment bagmen like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and Karl Rove’s American Crossroads, mainstream conservatives believe they have a candidate who can beat Democrat Kay Hagan to win a valuable Senate seat in November.

from The Great Debate:

Bundy: Counterfeit hero

By Neal Gabler
April 25, 2014

The shelf life of heroes isn’t what it used to be.

Once upon a time, a hero would burst upon the scene -- a Charles A. Lindbergh, a Babe Ruth, a Red Grange, an Audie Murphy, a Neil Armstrong -- and he would not only receive reverent acclaim, that acclaim would last for decades. Sometimes forever.

from The Great Debate:

The lost promise of progressive taxes

By Ajay K. Mehrotra
April 15, 2014

By midnight on April 15, roughly 140 million Americans will have filed their federal income tax returns and breathed a sigh of relief. Politicians from both parties, however, will spend most of the day criticizing our current tax system.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Rand Paul: The pied piper

By Nicholas Wapshott
March 24, 2014

The warm welcome that Senator Rand Paul (R-Ky.) received from an audience of mostly young Americans at the University of California, Berkeley, last week should send a shiver down the spines of Democrats.