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from Photographers' Blog:

Portraits of Olympic preparation

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Park City, Utah

By Lucas Jackson

It’s that time of year again. All around us the leaves are changing, the air is getting crisp, and while most of us are enjoying one of the nicest times of the year around the world, thousands of world class athletes are entering the final phases of their training to compete in the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics.

GALLERY: TEAM USA

This past week I was assigned for the second time in as many years to take portraits of more than a hundred members of the U.S. Olympic team before they finish their training and head to the Olympics. These media weeks organized by the U.S. Olympic Committee are an amazing opportunity for media outlets from all over the country to sit down, interview and photograph our athletes with little disruption to their training schedules or personal lives before one of the biggest events of their athletic careers. For the photographers it is a whirlwind three days where we spend anywhere from 30 seconds to five minutes trying to capture a portrait of every athlete who attends.

In 2012 at the summer Olympic media summit in Dallas, Texas I thought of a series I wanted to work on during my last day photographing. Luckily, I able to expand upon that idea this trip. In Dallas I began asking the athletes to stretch as they would before a competition or training session, to think or visualize as their would prior to performing. Instantly I noticed their faces changed and the look of focus that got them to this point took over their expression. At this point I asked the athletes to ignore me for a few minutes so that I could photograph moments that to each athlete was as routine as sleeping and eating, but to me were honest moments that I was not directing.

It was this concept I decided to work with going into this year's portrait session. I decided that for the entire summit I would ask each athlete to imagine that they were minutes from competing in their sport and to try and enter the mental head space that they do just before they go out onto the ice or hurdle themselves down the mountain. For a number of athletes I asked them to put their gear on in the same order they would for a competition and then to envision a run or going out on the ice. By doing this I was able to capture personal routines and small rituals that manage to capture a tiny slice of the focus that these athletes have demonstrated to get to this point. For me, these portraits achieve a level of honesty that can be difficult to capture and it is exciting to have done so successfully.

from Photographers' Blog:

Athletic endeavors for remote cameras

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Moscow, Russia

By Fabrizio Bensch and Pawel Kopczynski


Canon 1DX, 70-200 1:2.8 + 1,4 converter, 1/2500 sec at f/8, 1250 ISO

The great success of remote and robotic cameras during the London Olympics opened up a new window of opportunities to shoot sports pictures from above.

With that in mind, our preparation for the World Athletics in Moscow started back in November 2012, as we began to analyze the venue from a technical point of view.

from Photographers' Blog:

Gear for a gecko portrait shoot

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Rochester, New York

By Adam Fenster

When I got a call from one of the publicists in University Communications a couple of weeks ago asking whether we should try to find stock art or make our own photos to illustrate a recent paper by University of Rochester PhD student Daniel Scantlebury, I immediately jumped at the chance. I had read that the paper, which describes a slowdown in the rate at which species form on Madagascar, involved obscure gecko species and, as an occasional photographer of frogs and other critters, I thought it would be a great opportunity to make some interesting studio photographs, push my photography skills and at the same time help to publicize a critical scientific study.

GALLERY: MADAGASCAR GECKOS

I emailed Dan, explaining what I wanted to try and emphasizing that the comfort and safety of his geckos was critical. I had been told he had a collection containing some of the animals in the study but was distressed to learn upon meeting him in his office later that he had given them away. Fortunately, as someone with close ties to Rochester’s “gecko community”, he was able to put me in touch with Thomas Wood, a local expert and aquarium store owner who possesses a large collection of the same leaf tailed gecko species that were part of the study.

from Photographers' Blog:

The Nik Wallenda show – from a distance

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Grand Canyon, Arizona

By Mike Blake

The world loves an intriguing story and if television can wrap it up into a prime time event - then the show must go on.

That said, sometimes history is uneventful. This is why I was off to Flagstaff, Arizona to cover Nik Wallenda walking across the Grand Canyon on a tight rope. Details were sketchy at first. The Discovery Channel was in control of access and waivers and releases had to be cleared before we would sign on to cover. A media position was being set up, but we were told it was a distance away.

from Photographers' Blog:

Kentucky Derby by the numbers

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The Reuters pictures team of John Gress, Matt Sullivan and Jeff Haynes reflect on covering the past weekend's Kentucky Derby.

By Jeff Haynes

Fast forward 25 years from 1988 and the Winning Colors victory to 2013 and Orb, include every Kentucky Derby winner in-between and you have a total of roughly 50 minutes of what I call a spring time tradition - photographing what many call the most photographed two minutes in sports. Just like in years past photographing the Derby for me is one of the most thrilling events I cover each year. 2013 was no different.

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