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from Breakingviews:

SoftBank’s U.S. mobile retreat is least bad option

By Peter Thal Larsen 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Masayoshi Son has been forced to scale back his mobile phone ambitions in the United States. The chief executive of Japan’s SoftBank has belatedly bowed to hostile regulators and abandoned plans for his Sprint unit’s $32 billion takeover of T-Mobile US. He has chosen the least bad option.

Son’s plan to create a U.S. mobile phone operator to challenge industry leaders Verizon and AT&T always looked a long shot. Antitrust regulators had already blocked one takeover of T-Mobile US, and had publicly signalled their opposition to a combination with Sprint even though no deal was ever formally announced.

For a while it looked as if Son might be willing to gamble a $2 billion break fee on a merger that Bernstein analysts estimate could have delivered savings with a present value worth up to $30 billion. However, pushing ahead would have left Sprint in regulatory limbo for as long as a year at a time when it is losing customers. A recent ruling by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission that effectively bars Sprint and T-Mobile US from jointly bidding in the upcoming auction of mobile spectrum helped swing the decision.

from Breakingviews:

Microsoft’s China dream sorely strains credibility

By Ethan Bilby

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Xbox gamers fear the “red ring of death”, a flashing light that can herald system failure. Microsoft, which makes the consoles, must be awaiting a similar sign in China. After 22 years, the tech giant has achieved little in the country, which looks to account for around 2 percent of revenue. Cloud services may multiply that over time, but political headwinds are raising the cost of business - possibly too high.

from Breakingviews:

French T-Mo bid looks like peak TMT Entrepreneur

Quentin Webb

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

TMT-men are the superheroes of finance today. A market boom has let telecoms, media and technology dealmakers such as John Malone of Liberty Global and Masayoshi Son of SoftBank finance ever-bigger dreams. Xavier Niel, the billionaire behind French telecoms group Iliad, is now bidding $15 billion in cash for 56.6 percent of T-Mobile US, listed but two-thirds owned by Deutsche Telekom. Maybe this idea should have stayed in the lab.

from Breakingviews:

Yahoo’s Mayer nears post-Alibaba reckoning

By Richard Beales

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Yahoo is a big company with a much smaller one struggling to get out. A 22.5 percent stake in Alibaba accounts for well over half the U.S. internet group’s roughly $36 billion market capitalization, according to a new Breakingviews calculator. With the Chinese e-commerce giant likely to go public next month, Yahoo Chief Executive Marissa Mayer will find out how investors value the businesses she actually runs.

from Edward Hadas:

Growth in a rich and crowded world

Perky, productive robots, or nothing more than a few new smartphone apps? Cascading innovation, or just a few tweaks? Economists and technologists are debating what the future holds.

Pessimists like Robert Gordon of Northwestern University see decades of slow growth ahead, with little scope for big leaps forward. The optimists, among them Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, expect new technological glories. Both sides are more wrong than right.

from Breakingviews:

The perks and pitfalls of depending on Jack Ma

By John Foley 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Buy a share in Alibaba and you place your trust in Jack Ma. The Chinese e-commerce giant’s founder, executive chairman and spiritual sultan will remain a controlling force even after the company completes its massive initial public offering later this year. The $100 billion-plus question for prospective shareholders is whether they can depend on him to always act in their best interests.

from Breakingviews:

China’s “De-IOE” campaign takes a bite out of tech

By Rob Cyran 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

China’s “De-IOE” campaign is taking a bite out of some Silicon Valley stalwarts. For those unfamiliar with the term, it’s being used by tech executives to describe Beijing’s nudging of state enterprises to wean themselves off U.S. software and service firms, chiefly IBM, Oracle and EMC. The drive, which has been going on for at least a year, but accelerated after Washington indicted Chinese army officials, has dimmed the brightest star in Big Tech’s otherwise dull constellation.

from Breakingviews:

Supercharged IPO tax spoils need splitting

By Robert Cyran

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Initial public offerings that generate extra tax spoils are in the spotlight. KKR and Silver Lake are listing web hosting company GoDaddy, three years after buying it for $2.25 billion. The use of what’s called an “Up-C” structure means the company will float with big potential tax deductions on its books. In GoDaddy’s case, investors and sponsors will both benefit. But other IPOs with Up-Cs have seen more dubious arrangements.

from Breakingviews:

Doubling down on First Data may be KKR’s best bet

By Jeffrey Goldfarb and Richard Beales

The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are their own.

Doubling down on First Data may have been KKR’s best bet. The extra cash just injected into the payment processor means the $29 billion acquisition has now absorbed over $10 billion of equity, one of the highest sums ever for a leveraged buyout. A Breakingviews analysis, however, suggests that a return finally beckons.

from Breakingviews:

Gowex collapse leaves egg on many faces

By Fiona Maharg-Bravo

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

The collapse of Gowex has ramifications beyond Spain’s junior stock market for riskier companies. The Spanish wifi provider has said its chief executive admitted falsifying the accounts, days after investment firm Gotham City Research attacked the company. With Gowex held up as the poster child for Spanish entrepreneurialism, its impending failure will make life harder for other small firms.

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