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from Financial Regulatory Forum:

IA brief: Account takeovers are big cybersecurity risk for advisers

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By Jason Wallace, Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, April 24, 2014 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - A recent cybersecurity roundtable hosted by the Securities and Exchange Commission should act as a call to action for investment advisers, as the threat of cyber attacks is high for all companies and increasing daily, say event panelists.

Investment advisers, whether small or midsize, are not immune from these attacks and now is a good time to recognize the firm’s risks, review available guidance, hone formal policies and procedures, and preparing for an imminent SEC exam module concerning cybersecurity.

David Tittsworth’s, executive director of the Investment Adviser Association, gave the roundtable an overview of the cybersecurity risks often seen in the adviser community. A traditional adviser or investment manager’s top risk is account takeover. For private and institutional wealth-management advisers, the risks include hackers and denial of service. Tittsworth also noted that internal risks apply to all advisory firms.

A majority of advisers are small businesses and typically lack the resources or tools that larger firms have to protect against and combat cyber attacks. However, awareness is the first tool for ensuring that advisers are not falling behind, according to Tittsworth.

from Financial Regulatory Forum:

IA brief: SEC opens door to social media ratings and client lists

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By Jason Wallace, Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, April 22, 2014 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - The Securities and Exchange Commission’s guidance update this week on investment adviser use of social media and the applicability of the testimonial rule will help ease uncertainty over using of certain features of social media sites like Yelp, Foursquare, Facebook and LinkedIn.

The guidance, in the form of 9 questions and answers, primarily focused on the use of third-party review sites and whether it would trigger a testimonial violation. The guidance included specific examples opening the door to using Yelp, Foursquare or a similar site that offers a business review feature, granted certain conditions are achieved.

from Financial Regulatory Forum:

Forget HFT; “High Intelligence Trading” is the new frontier for technology, markets, regulation

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By Henry Engler, Compliance Complete

NEW YORK, Apr. 10, 2014 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - While fast is good, smart is better, and with untold resources of computing power and memory banks in the clouds, the new frontier in electronic trading combines sophisticated intelligent software with rapid-fire processing, enabling traders to stay one step ahead of the regulators.

“What’s the difference between pure speed and adding intelligence to that speed?” asked Terry Keene, head of iSys, a technology integration firm, at a conference focused on high performance computing. The answer is “big data analytics” that brings decision-making and trading to a “near-time” environment, he added.

from Breakingviews:

China tech rout sifts IPO haves from don’t-needs

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By John Foley 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Falling prices of internet stocks are a headache for companies yet to join the market. The sell off that began in the first week of March and broke on April 8 hit Chinese companies particularly hard. It may leave investors pickier about coming initial public offerings of tech companies from the People’s Republic. The haves will be sorted from the don’t-needs.

from Financial Regulatory Forum:

Book by high-profile author Lewis may spur high-frequency-trading reform push, success unclear

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By Emmanuel Olaoye, Compliance Complete

WASHINGTON/NEW YORK, Apr. 2, 2014 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) - During a clip on Sunday night's "60 Minutes" program, host Steve Kroft asked bestselling author Michael Lewis why he was so opposed to high frequency trading.

"If it wasn't so complicated, it would be illegal," said Lewis, who is the author of a new book called "Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt." 

from Photographers' Blog:

Back on his feet

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New York, United States

By Mike Segar

On a cold Wednesday morning in March 2014, I saw Errol Samuels sitting in his wheelchair before a therapy session at a New York City hospital named Mount Sinai.

 

Errol, a 22-year-old from Hollis, Queens, is paraplegic. The week before his college final exams in May 2012, he and his friends went to an off-campus party. He went out on a deck and the roof collapsed on him, crushing his spine. Errol says his doctors “didn’t need to tell me what was wrong. Once it happened, I couldn’t move my legs at all”. But remarkably, less than two years later with the help of a revolutionary new device named the “ReWalk”, Errol is back on his feet.

from Felix Salmon:

Mark Zuckerberg, the Warren Buffett of technology?

What does Mark Zuckerberg think he’s doing, spending $2 billion on Oculus? You could take him at his word — that he sees virtual reality as “a new communication platform” where “truly present” people “can share unbounded spaces and experiences”. Basically, virtual is the new mobile, and Zuckerberg wants to get in on the game early.

But note what Zuckerberg doesn’t say, as much as what he does. There’s no mention of “social”, no mention even of “Facebook”. Zuckerberg is one of the greatest product managers in history, but his legendary focus is nowhere to be seen here: it’s all big, vague, hand-waving futurism. And note too one of the quieter members of Zuckerberg’s board of directors: Donald Graham, the CEO of what used to be called the Washington Post Company, and old friend of Warren Buffett.

from The Great Debate:

How technology widens the gender gap

The Internet and mobile phones have transformed our connections to people around the world. This technology has also, however, led to a widening gender gap in poorer countries. For it is largely men who control the information revolution that helps to educate, inform and empower.

In low and middle-income countries, a woman is 21 percent less likely than a man to own a mobile phone, according to research done by GSMA. In Africa, women are 23 percent less likely than a man to own a cell phone. In the Middle East the figure is 24 percent and in South Asia, 37 percent,

from Felix Salmon:

The rational Candy Crush IPO

Jim Surowiecki is absolutely right about the IPO of King Digital Entertainment, the makers of Candy Crush Saga. The point of an IPO is to raise permanent capital for a company which intends to exist in perpetuity, while King will realistically last only as long as the Candy Crush fad. King will probably never again make the kind of money ($568 million) it made last year, and yet it issued options in January at a crazy $9.4 billion valuation.

Surowiecki writes:

It’s easy to see why King’s founders want to go public: money. But the money isn’t worth the hassle. As a public company, King will have to show shareholders consistent results and ever-growing profits. Such expectations are, frankly, silly in crazily competitive, hit-driven industries, and trying to meet them is a recipe for frustration. If King stayed private, it could milk its cash cow and build games without having to worry overmuch about hatching a new cultural juggernaut. We expect companies to constantly be in search of the next big thing. But, for one-hit wonders, the smartest strategy might be to just enjoy it while it lasts.

from Felix Salmon:

Satoshi: Why Newsweek isn’t convincing

I had a 2-hour phone conversation with Leah McGrath Goodman yesterday. Goodman wrote the now-notorious Newsweek cover story about Dorian Nakamoto, which purported to out him as the inventor of bitcoin. At this point, it’s pretty obvious that the world is not convinced: in that sense, the story did not do its job.

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