from Breakingviews:

Review: Dealmaking when lives are at stake

July 10, 2015

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from The Great Debate:

Never the next great power: Argentina’s future is always stuck in the past

By Daniela Blei
March 23, 2015

People light candles next to a sign during a protest over the death of prosecutor Alberto Nisman, at the Plaza de Mayo square in Buenos Aires

People light candles next to a sign that reads "I am Nisman" during a protest over the death of prosecutor Alberto Nisman, at the Plaza de Mayo square in Buenos Aires, January 19, 2015. REUTERS/Agustin Marcarian

from The Great Debate:

One (difficult) step to curbing extremism

By Sarah Chayes
February 3, 2015

Smoke and flames rise over a hill near the Syrian town of Kobani after an airstrike, as seen from the Mursitpinar crossing on the Turkish-Syrian border in the southeastern town of Suruc in Sanliurfa province, October 23, 2014. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

Smoke and flames rise over a hill near the Syrian town of Kobani after an airstrike, as seen from the Mursitpinar crossing on the Turkish-Syrian border in the southeastern town of Suruc in Sanliurfa province, October 23, 2014. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

from The Great Debate:

‘Charlie Hebdo’: High-impact, low-tech tactics add chilling dimension to attacks

By Matthew Green
January 9, 2015

French soldier patrol near the Eiffel Tower in Paris as part of the highest level of "Vigipirate" security

In the aftermath of 9/11, the biggest fear that haunted U.S. counter-terrorism officials was that al-Qaeda or its allies would somehow get hold of a weapon of mass destruction: a biological agent or a nuclear bomb.

from The Great Debate:

The pope’s door is always open to ISIS. Why America’s should be, too.

By Jonathan Powell
December 8, 2014

Hamas fighter speaks on the phone as he sits inside the personal meeting hall of President Abbas after they captured his headquarters in Gaza

Pope Francis strayed into controversy recently when he said that, while he supported military action against Islamic State, he also would not rule out speaking to the group if it would help bring peace to Syria and Iraq. “It is difficult, one could say almost impossible, but the door is always open,” he said.

from The Great Debate:

Revoking passports isn’t the way to stop American jihadists from returning home

By Patrick Weil
October 7, 2014

Undated handout picture of a passport of a man identified as Ramy Zamzam

As the Western world confronts the threat posed by the Islamic State, many officials are pushing for stricter measures to be put in place to protect the United States from home-bound jihadists carrying U.S. passports.

from Jack Shafer:

This month’s ultimate enemy — the Islamic State

By Jack Shafer
August 26, 2014

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At an Aug. 21 Pentagon press conference, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel claimed that the Islamic State "is as sophisticated and well-funded as any group that we have seen. They're beyond just a terrorist group. They marry ideology, a sophistication of strategic and tactical military prowess. They are tremendously well-funded."

from David Rohde:

Obama’s counterterrorism doctrine: Let locals lead the fight

By David Rohde
June 4, 2014

Congolese peacekeepers from the Multinational Force of Central Africa listen to morning instructions from their commander at the FOMAC base in Bossangoa, Central African Republic, November 25, 2013. REUTERS/Joe Penney

Congolese peacekeepers from the Multinational Force of Central Africa listen to morning instructions from their commander at the FOMAC base in Bossangoa, Central African Republic, November 25, 2013. REUTERS/Joe Penney

from The Great Debate:

Gitmo: Too dangerous to release? Not so fast.

By Daphne Eviatar
May 15, 2014

File photo of detainees sitting in a holding area at Naval Base Guantanamo Bay

When the National September 11 Memorial & Museum opens Thursday, we will finally have a national institution dedicated to exploring the effects of the tragic events of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

from The Great Debate:

Swift U.S. jury verdict gives lie to Gitmo

By Daphne Eviatar
March 26, 2014

The government’s charges against Osama bin Laden’s son-in-law looked pretty thin. Washington was basically claiming that the Kuwaiti imam had made a few inflammatory speeches -- one praising the September 11 attacks and another warning that more attacks on tall buildings were soon to come. It didn’t sound like much, given that the charges were providing “material support” for terrorism and conspiring to kill Americans.