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from The Great Debate:

Perry’s indictment: Crime and punishment, Texas-style

Texas Governor Perry, a possible Republican candidate for 2016 presidential race, answers questions from reporters following appearance at business leaders luncheon in Portsmouth

It’s a big country, where states have their own legal peculiarities, political cultures and definitions of what makes a debilitating political scandal. Take Texas, for example, where the Republican governor, Rick Perry, has been indicted for abuse of office.

In the past 25 years, we’ve seen politicians and government officials increasingly treat scandal less as catastrophe and more as just another cost of doing business. Perry, however, has taken this to a completely new level: He is wearing his indictment as a badge of honor and has smoothly returned to his 2016 presidential campaign without missing a beat.

His is a compelling change of pace. Consider: It’s been a hell of a decade for scandal among state governors -- and virtually all reacted with an advanced degree of alarm. In 2004, Democratic Governor Jim McGreevey of New Jersey, threatened with a lawsuit by another man, promptly held a press conference, revealed himself as a “gay American” and announced his impending resignation. In March 2008, news broke that New York’s Democratic governor, scourge-of-Wall-Street Elliot Spitzer, had patronized call girls. Another press conference, another resignation. Later that year, Illinois Democratic Governor Rod Blagojevich was arrested by federal agents and charged with corruption for his attempt to sell Barack Obama’s vacated Senate seat. Blagojevich launched an animated attempt to clear his name before he was impeached, removed from office, tried and sent to prison.

Supporters hold up a t-shirt with the word "Wanted" written over a photograph of Texas Governor Rick Perry, a possible Republican candidate for the 2016 presidential race at a "NH GOP Victory Rally" in StrathamSouth Carolina Republican Governor Mark Sanford disappeared briefly in 2009 and was discovered in Argentina -- where he had gone to be with his Latin mistress. He fought impeachment proceedings until the end of his term. When Republican Governor Bob McDonnell of Virginia was indicted last year for corruption and bribery, he apologized for bringing “embarrassment” to the state. He is now on trial. Meanwhile, Republican Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin, involved in an investigation of improper fundraising during his 2012 recall campaign, has been vigorously fighting subpoenas.

from The Great Debate:

You can’t blame immigrants for gun violence

A pile of handguns are placed in a trash bin after they were surrendered during a gun buyback program in Los Angeles, California

The eruption of anti-immigrant fury over the federal government’s plans to temporarily relocate undocumented Latino children to shelters and Border Patrol facilities in Murietta, California, and other cities, is largely founded on the expressed belief that immigrants bring drugs and crime, threatening the safety of communities.

Yet as figures from the Murietta Police Department show, Latinos commit fewer crimes, especially drug offenses, compared to whites in their respective proportions of the city’s population.  Racially diverse areas with rapidly growing, younger immigrant populations are also becoming dramatically safer from gun violence, according to surprising new figures from the Centers for Disease Control.

from The Great Debate:

Twitter use on the rise in #statecapitals

Twitter’s November initial public offering has been a success for the company’s founders and early investors. This reflects the market’s optimistic view of the company’s profit-making potential. For Twitter has transformed much of daily life -- including how we get our news, communicate with others and participate in public discourse. (In fact, many media outlets now factor in what is trending on Twitter when covering news stories.)

Many politicians are now using Twitter to raise their profile. Most notable is the newest senator, Cory Booker (D-N.J.). Despite the fact that he was mayor of Newark, a city known for its high unemployment and high school dropout rates rather than good governance and policy innovation, Booker’s effective use of Twitter (1,446,106 followers) played a key role in making him a national political figure.

from MuniLand:

Texas’ great energy success

Texas is America’s energy powerhouse, producing 16 percent of domestic energy, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration:

    Texas was the leading crude oil-producing State in the Nation in 2011 and exceeded production levels even from the Federal offshore areas. Texas accounted for 28 percent of U.S. marketed natural gas production in 2011, making it the leading natural gas producer among the States. Texas led the Nation in wind-powered generation capacity in 2010 and is the first State to reach 10,000 megawatts of wind capacity.

Although Texas is known for its oil and natural gas production, it is in the area of wind energy that Texas has hit a new milestone. The state opened a massive electricity transmission grid that was built to gather wind energy produced in West Texas and move it to the population centers in East Texas. It is the first to build infrastructure specifically to support industrial scale production of alternative energy. Here is how it happened, according to the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) of Texas:

from The Great Debate:

Democrats: It’s the states, stupid!

ILLUSTRATION: Matt Mahurin

Unless the Democrats wake up to the importance of winning state legislative elections, they are likely to remain a largely impotent minority in the House of Representatives and equally feeble in the state legislatures. The momentous Supreme Court decisions on the Voting Rights Act, same-sex marriage and affirmative action make winning these races all the more vital, for all these rulings deal with state action. The huge Republican victory in the 2010 election could turn out to be a gift that keeps giving.

The GOP electoral sweep in 2010 was no accident. Republicans understand the importance of the state legislative races. After the 2008 election the GOP adopted a strategy called the REDistricting MAjority Project (REDMAP). As Karl Rove explained:

from Full Focus:

Photos of the week

Our top photos from the past week.

from Full Focus:

Texas explosion

An explosion tore through a fertilizer plant and leveled dozens of homes in a small Texas town, killing up to 15 people, injuring more than 160 and spewing toxic fumes that forced the evacuation of half the community.

from MacroScope:

Texas-sized jobs growth turns puny? Don’t y’all believe it, Dallas Fed says

Is the pickup in U.S. jobs growth over before it even started? That’s the conclusion you might reach if you checked out the latest Texas employment update from the Dallas Fed , which shows the Lone Star state added only 4,000 jobs in January.Texas, as boosters like Dallas Fed President Richard Fisher never tire of pointing out, has been an enormous engine of job growth for the United States since the end of the Great Recession.

The state added 335,000 jobs last year. For it to generate a paltry 4,000 jobs in January – well, that sounds like bad news.

from The Great Debate:

California v. Texas in fight for the future

It is not a national election year, but the “red state versus blue state” wars continue. Texas Governor Rick Perry's recent foray into California, to lure away businesses and jobs, signals more than a rivalry between these two mega-states. The Texas-California competition represents the political, economic and cultural differences driving American politics today – and for the foreseeable future.

Texas and California are robust political and economic competitors. We don’t know which will be the template for the future. As California emerges from its economic and fiscal doldrums and some of Texas' vulnerabilities become evident, it is now far from certain that Texas will emerge the victor.

from MuniLand:

Texas takes the lead on public pension transparency

Texas Watchdog.org explains how Texas is mounting the transparency pony:

A quartet of the most powerful legislators in Texas filed bills Thursday to make available to the public detailed financial information from most local taxing entities and pension systems across the state.

Senate bills 14 and 13 and their identical House counterparts establish, at the request of state Comptroller Susan Combs, new requirements for the posting of public debt, unfunded liabilities, borrowing and project costs on websites maintained by state and local agencies.

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