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from Changing China:

Development and discrimination in Tibet

    By Emma Graham-Harrison
    Beijing has poured money into Tibet over decades of trying to bring the restive region to heel, raising average wages, restoring cultural treasures like the Potala Palace, even paying a monthly stipend to monks who hold  government permits.     Local officials are sensible about this munificence and grateful for the help in running one of China's poorest regions.     "The support of the government is the reason for Tibet's development. Without their backing....Tibet could not be its the current position," Tsering, vice chairman of the regional government, told reporters on a recent officially sponsored trip. Tsering, like many Tibetans, uses only one name.     The sentiments of ordinary Tibetans are more complicated. Many of them resent the political baggage that comes with the funds and the influx of Han Chinese who have followed.     There is little question that life has improved materially for many over the last 50 years, particularly in rural areas where scholars say the harshness of farming life has also kept outsiders away, helping to preserve traditional culture.
 
    "Life is better now. Every day is like our old New Year," said 55 year-old Gelek, a farmer who speaks only Tibetan and greeted a foreign visitor the old-fashioned way, by sticking out his tongue.
 
    He says he makes cash from vegetables grown for sale in Lhasa, has moved into a new house, and eats meat far more often than as a young man.
 
    But frustrated urbanites face discrimination and often see jobs that are created with cash from Beijing going to Han Chinese competitors.
 
    "They are very lovable as a people, but they are not really motivated about work," said one senior Han Chinese intellectual working in Lhasa who works with several Tibetans but shares prejudices common among many outsiders.
 
    "They start (a project) and then they go off for a drink and sometimes you call, and call and they don't even answer."     Many monks and nuns, whose numbers and religious activities are constrained by the government, also resent a ban on expressing their devotion to the man they still revere as spiritual leader -- the exiled Dalai Lama, who has been denounced by Beijing as a scheming separatist.     The Dalai Lama denies this accusation, saying he seeks only genuine autonomy within China, not a separate nation. Many Tibetans also appear more interested in religious and cultural freedoms than independence.      But on their right to those freedoms most Tibetans agree. Few have time for Beijing's ubiquitous assertion that Tibet has always been a part of China, which even led to a dispute over the Chinese version of a Tintin comic book -- published as "Tintin in China's Tibet" instead of just a straight translation of the English title "Tintin in Tibet".     "They treat us like a child and think they can deceive us. But we know Tibet was once an independent country," said a monk called Jigme in Tongren, an ethnic Tibetan part of neighbouring Qinghai province.
 
Photo Credit: Sixty-eight-year-old Tibetan farmer Danzeng Basa adjusts his solar-powered kettle outside his recently built house in a small village outside Lhasa, Feb. 12, 2009. REUTERS/Emma Graham-Harrison
   

from Changing China:

A Tibetan slap on the bum

By Emma Graham-Harrison

I was trying to take photos of pilgrims near the Potala Palace in Lhasa, with my government minders telling me to hurry up (we had a neighbourhood committee to visit) and the pilgrims looking uncomfortable as I snapped away at their devotions.

Suddenly a smiling old woman, dressed like she had stepped out of an engraving of 19th century Tibet, hobbled up behind me and gave me a resounding smack on the bum.

from Changing China:

The war that changed China

Thirty years ago today, China invaded its one-time Communist ally Vietnam to "teach it a lesson", to the delight of Beijing's newfound friend, Uncle Sam, which was still smarting from having lost its own Vietnam War.
 
The attack came on the heels of Washington switching diplomatic recognition from Taipei to Beijing and a closed-door meeting between China's paramount leader Deng Xiaoping and U.S. President Jimmy Carter in Washington.
 
Three decades on, it remains unclear just how much Deng told Carter about the incursion and whether Washington offered any assistance such as satellite imagery of Vietnamese troops and military bases.
 
Until the Chinese Foreign Ministry and the U.S. State Department declassify minutes of the meeting, the world will not know for sure whether the United States offered to back China in the event the Soviet Union rushed to Vietnam's rescue.
 
Now the great wheel of history has turned again, and 30 years on, the United States is seeking China's help in applying pressure on another Communist neighbour, North Korea.
 
China's foray into Vietnam was brief yet in some ways disastrous. Its troops suffered terribly against the battle-hardened Vietnamese who were fighting on their home soil.
 
But there is no arguing that the invasion was a watershed event that smoothed the way for China to mend fences with the West.  American investors, tourists and students flocked to China.  Western and Japanese aid and loans flowed in, while trade and investment mushroomed, helping to transform the world's most populous nation from an economic backwater into an export powerhouse and the world's third-biggest economy.
 
In an apparent quid pro quo, China abandoned its longstanding policy of "liberating" Taiwan and offered "peaceful reunification" in an overture to the self-ruled island it has claimed as its own since their split in 1949 amid civil war.
 
Also in 1979, Deng invited Tibet's exiled spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, to visit, prompting the latter to renounce advocacy of Tibetan independence, beseech CIA-armed and -trained Tibetan guerrillas to end their struggle and send his older brother to China on fact-finding trips.
 
The United States softened its criticism of human rights abuse in China, including the imprisonment of dissident Wei Jingsheng for challenging Deng at the height of the Democracy Wall movement.
 
American Sinologist David Shambaugh described as a "marriage of convenience" the teaming up of the United States and China to curb Soviet expansionism.
(http://www.iht.com/articles/2009/01/06/opinion/edshambaugh.php)
 
On a lighter note, American culture invaded China. Many Chinese traded their Mao suits for jeans or business suits and dined at McDonald's and KFC outlets. Hollywood movies and rock 'n' roll -- once considered decadent by China's ideologues -- swept many Chinese off their feet.
 
The honeymoon abruptly ended on June 4, 1989, when Chinese troops crushed student-led demonstrations for democracy centred on Beijing's Tiananmen Square. China slipped into diplomatic isolation in the face of U.S. sanctions.
 
China broke out of isolation and forced the United States to deal with it after menacing Taiwan with war games in the run-up to the island's first direct presidential elections in 1996. Bilateral relations see-sawed in the ensuing years, hitting low points when NATO bombed the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade and a U.S. spy plane collided with a Chinese jet fighter over Chinese airspace.
 
Fast forward to February 2009. When U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton visits on Friday, she will be dealing with a richer, more confident and assertive China.  Again, but now in peacetime, it will be a China that needs the United States as much as the United States needs China.
 
The United States needs China to help rein in a nuclear North Korea and help nurse the global economy back to health. But China's abrupt slowdown in growth and exports shows that it remains yoked to U.S. fortunes.

Photo Credit: A Vietnamese border guard stands next to a border marker between China's Guangxi and Vietnam's Lang Son provinces on Jan. 13, 2009. REUTERS/Kham

from FaithWorld:

TIME magazine lists its 10 top religion stories of 2008

TIME magazine has come out with its list of the 10 top religion stories of 2008. The winner is a story about how religion did not tip the balance in the U.S. presidential election. U.S. media often publish this kind of list at the end of the year. Are there similar lists out there from other countries? Please let us know if you see them elsewhere.

Here are TIME's top 10:

1. The Economy Trumps Religion 2. Never Count the Mormons Out

3. The Pope Wows the States 4. The Canterbury non-Tale

5. America's Unfaithful Faith

6. Tibet's Monks Rebel

7. The Birth of the New Evangelicalism

8. The Challenge of Recession

9. When Kosher Wasn't Kosher

10. Extraterrestrials May Already be Saved

from Photographers' Blog:

Tibetan prayers: Audio slideshow

womanbending.JPG

A five day prayer meeting is temporarily held at a monastery in Tongren, Qinghai province. Monks blessed sweets, fruit and biscuits then distributed to the worshipers, who scrambled to get them.

Click here to view an audio slideshow.

from FaithWorld:

Dalai Lama gets almost top treatment in France

Dalai Lama and Carla Bruni-Sarkozy at Lerab Ling temple in Roqueredonde, southern France, 22 August 2008/Philippe LaurensonSensitive about possibly upsetting Beijing, President Nicolas Sarkozy decided not to meet the Dalai Lama during the Tibetan spiritual leader's current visit to France. But he sent an envoy who got just as much media coverage (if not more) than he would have -- his wife. Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (left), the pop singer and former supermodel Sarkozy married in February, attended the consecration of a Tibetan Buddhist temple in southern France on Friday. Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner, Human Rights Minister Rama Yade and former prime minister Alain Juppé were also at the Lerab Ling temple, but French media made only fleeting references to their presence.

Read our report by correspondent Estelle Shirbon here.

Segolene Royal and Dalai Lama, 16 August 2008/poolEven before any comment came from China, France's opposition Socialist Party criticised the meeting as "a serious slide into celebrity- mania ("peopolisation") in political life" and rapped the two ministers for taking a secondary role at the ceremony. "They should have received the Dalai Lama in a secular and official setting," a party spokesman said.

from Changing China:

Mackeben rows back on robe protest

MACKEBEN OF GERMANY CELEBRATES HIS GOAL AGAINST RUSSIA AT THE WATER POLO OLYMPIC GAMES QUALIFICATION …A German water polo player who had earlier this year floated the idea of his team wearing orange robes a symbolic protest at the Olympics against China's Tibet has changed his mind, saying the Tibet issue is far too complex and that he knows too little about China to organise such a demonstration.

Soeren Mackeben, 29, told Der Spiegel news magazine this week:  "I've become more sceptical towards all sides in the meantime." Mackeben had first proposed wearing the orange robes -- the same colour as the Tibetan monks -- in an interview in March.   

from Changing China:

Explorer running with the torch

Pupils raise their handmade model torches of 2008 Beijing Olympic Games to celebrate torch relay in China at a primary school in HuzhouWong How Man is one of China's best known and most active explorers, whose accomplishments include an expedition that discovered a new source of the Yangtze, China's longest river.   

More recently the Hong Kong native and his group, China Exploration & Research Society, have taken on a number of conservation projects in Tibetan areas of China -- work that helped him land a spot as an Olympic torch runner last week.

from Changing China:

Bach on Beijing

DOSB president Bach addresses the media during a news conference in FrankfurtI caught up with IOC vice president Thomas Bach for an interview the other day in his Berlin office.

Bach has been one of the most eloquent opponents of any boycott of the Summer Olympics in Beijing -- leading a lightning pro-Games campaign earlier this year when tensions in Tibet flared.

from Changing China:

Politics and the Olympics over the years

WASHINGTON - The Olympics are supposed to be all about sports, not politics, right?

Wrong.

Although the Games began in 1896 with the hope that sporting events between nations could bring about a more peaceful world, they have not escaped politics.

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