from FaithWorld:

Can China and the Vatican make beautiful music together?

April 30, 2008

World Team Table Tennis Championships in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou, 2 March 2008/Bobby YipRemember ping-pong diplomacy, the exchange of ping-pong players between the United States and communist China in the 1970s that was one of the first steps that led to a thaw in relations between the two countries? If the Vatican had a ping-pong team, perhaps China would have considered sending their squad to the walled city in Rome for a match.

from Changing China:

Nick, the torch and Mt Everest – Day 3

April 30, 2008

Remarkably we managed to get to our night stop, Tingri (4,300m), in time for lunch.

from Changing China:

Nick, the torch and Everest – prologue

April 30, 2008

We’re here, where’s the torch?

We arrived. For a long time it looked like we wouldn’t, but on Monday morning, four days after leaving Beijing, 11 foreign journalists arrived at the media centre on the lower slopes of Mount Everest to report on the torch relay.

from Photographers' Blog:

The World’s Worst Road……UPDATE 1!!!!!

April 15, 2008

     Well........I don't believe it!!! It's happened. If you've read my last blog, ‘The Road West of Kangding' you know that I called that particular road ‘the worst road in the world'. Well....guess what....there is much worse.

from Photographers' Blog:

The Road West from Kangding

March 25, 2008

If someone had asked me just a few days ago what the worst road I could imagine in the world would be like, I would have told them probably a mountain road with lots and lots of rocks and pot-holes. Well, little did I imagine that these elements would combine with two mountain passes of around 4000 metres, vertical drops off the sides of around 500 metres, snow, ice and to top it all off, local police telling you that you cannot get to where you want to go.
The area is Sichuan Province in south-western China. The town is Kangding, located around 400 kilometres west of the capital Chengdu. The road leads west, towards Tibet. I am trying to cover the story about the violence that has spread into the province following the rioting in the Tibetan capital Lhasa on March 14. In order to find out what is going on, myself and text journalist John Ruwitch needed to get to another town called Litang, some 400 kilometres west of Kangding, where there were reports of trouble last week.

from Our Take on Your Take:

Surrounded

March 20, 2008

It's all about the angle and emotion in this image by Sam Kang Li from a rally by Tibetan protesters in Nepal. Through the use of the angle you view the protesters from the police point of view. The raw emotion on their faces adds the human element to the photo.

from FaithWorld:

Pope breaks “silence” on Tibet with carefully worded appeal

March 19, 2008

Pope Benedict XVI delivers his blessings at the end of his weekly general audience in Paul VI hall at the VaticanAs readers of this blog will have noticed, I posted a note yesterday about calls by Italian intellectuals for Pope Benedict to break his supposed silence over Tibet. On Wednesday he did so at his weekly general audience, making a carefully worded appeal (here in Italian) for an end to the suffering of the people there.

from FaithWorld:

Italians ask how long Pope can remain silent on Tibet

March 18, 2008

A demonstrator holds a placard against the Olympic Games in Beijing in front of the IOC headquarters in LausannePope Benedict is just about the only world leader not to have said anything about the events in Tibet. This hasn't gone unnoticed in Italy, where some commentators have been urging him to speak out -- and others have been defending him for not doing so.

from UK News:

Should Britain boycott the Olympics over Tibet?

March 17, 2008

tibet.jpgThe idea of a boycott of this Summer's Beijing Olympics in protest at the handling of events in Tibet is not yet an official policy of any government or major human rights organization.

from Our Take on Your Take:

On location in Tibet

March 14, 2008

Tibet protests

It's not every day you see military personnel on the streets of Tibet and it's certainly not every day that we receive picture of it. So, when a You Witness contributor (who prefers not to be named due to the sensitivity of the story) sent in three dramatic images of exactly that, they were quickly sent off to our chief photographer in China who contacted him directly to seek permission and arrange payment for using the images on the Reuters Pictures Wire service. In total, 12 images from this You Witness contributor have been sent to an international audience via the Reuters Pictures Wire.