from India Insight:

For Oscar-winning Tanovic, Emraan Hashmi’s “serial kisser” tag didn’t matter

September 16, 2014

When Danis Tanovic chose Bollywood star Emraan Hashmi to play a Pakistani whistle-blower in his new project, the Oscar-winning Bosnian film-maker wasn’t aware of the actor’s notoriety as Indian cinema's "serial kisser".
Tanovic eventually watched some of Hashmi’s Bollywood hits and found it funny that the actor had such a different image in India.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

It’s a jungle out there…

May 7, 2011

GERMANY/

Johnson, get your butt into my office!

What did I do now, Boss? I thought I was improving as a news photographer.

GERMANY/You are! I see all of our clients used YOUR photos of new those tiger cubs at the zoo. It's as if the competition didn't even send anybody!

from Environment Forum:

Backyard tigers

October 20, 2010

ENVIRONMENT-TIGERS/Would you keep a tiger as a pet?

A puppy-sized tiger cub can be bought in the United States for as little as $200, and there are probably about 5,000 such backyard tigers across the country, about the same number of privately owned tigers in China, according to World Wildlife Fund.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

I guess he’s seen a dart gun before, Earl!

February 4, 2010

INDIA/

I'll tell you what, Earl, this ain't good. When a tiger escapes from a zoo, somebody notices something like that!

from Fan Fare:

“Birds” star Tippi Hedren says Michael Jackson’s tigers doing fine

November 4, 2009

Back in 2006, actress Tippi Hedren adopted Michael Jackson's two tigers from his Neverland Ranch, the Central California property that Jackson all but abandoned after his 2005 trial and acquittal on child molestation charges.tippi-hedren

from Environment Forum:

Can Indiana Jones help save tigers?

June 10, 2008

World Bank President Robert Zoellick (L) and actor Harrison Ford take part in the launch of the Tiger Conservation Initiative at the National Zoo in Washington June 9, 2008. The initiative will bring together wildlife experts, scientists and governments to try to halt the killing and thriving illegal trade in tiger skins, meat and body parts used in traditional Asian medicines. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES)Indiana Jones and the World Bank sound like an odd couple to get anything done ("Quick, shoot that robber!" "Wait, we have to do a two-year feasibility study first!") but are part of a new alliance trying to save the world's tigers. (Read my colleague Leslie Wroughton's fine story here)