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from The Human Impact:

Q+A – Child-friendly toilets key in fight to improve global sanitation

If toilets meet children’s needs, this will keep them in school longer, reduce the spread of life-threatening diarrhoeal diseases and help meet development goals, according to the charity Water For People.

At least 2.5 billion people worldwide do not have proper sanitation facilities. The combined effects of improper sanitation, unsafe water supply and poor hygiene are estimated to cause almost 2,000 child deaths per day, the U.N. children’s agency, UNICEF, reports.

“Allowing youth to become comfortable using toilets and practising good hygiene from a young age, means that as they grow up there are fewer people to educate and convince of the reasons that improved toilets are important,” said Kate Fogelberg, Water For People’s regional manager in South America.

“It’s much more difficult to change adult behaviour than children’s behaviour -- solving the sanitation crisis is as much about changing people’s behaviour as it is about installing toilets.”

from The Human Impact:

Technological solutions are key to fix Africa sanitation crisis

Morris Marah is project manager at Africa Gathering, a network of people focused on encouraging sustainable development using technology and social networking.

The Sanitation hackathon is a global project where developers are working on solutions to challenges facing the sanitation sector using mobile technology over a 48-hour period. Globally, 2.5 billion people do not have adequate sanitation facilities.

from The Human Impact:

World Toilet Day chance to fight sanitation indignities women face – activist Helen Pankhurst

Helen Pankhurst, a member of charity WaterAid's board of trustees, spoke at a World Toilet Day event at London's Anthologist restaurant.

http://youtu.be/rv8tfYezxRc

The "1 in 3 women event" marked the day by drawing attention to the fact that there are 1.25 billion women in the world who have nowhere safe to go to the toilet.

from India Insight:

The news this weekend: LPG, Kejriwal, toilets, politicians… and Somali pirates

It's shaping up as a busy weekend for India's politicians...

The price of LPG -- liquefied petroleum gas cylinders, or cooking gas -- has risen 11.42 rupees per cylinder because dealers are getting higher commissions. TV channels attacked the government because this "shocker" comes right after the imposition of a cap on subsidized cylinder sales was imposed.

Bharatiya Janata Party politician Smriti Irani said the party will hold a nation-wide protest on Oct. 12, saying the higher prices are “anti-women”. This is presumably because they do more of the daily cooking than men, whose potential inversely proportional waistline shrinkage could be in their favour.

from India Insight:

Luxury toilet row raises stink for Indian govt

Every morning, Dharma picks up a bottle of water and heads to a field to defecate. His wife goes to a public toilet nearby. The 29-year-old cobbler has been living and working in India’s capital for over ten years now, but he still does not have a toilet in his house. Just like millions of Indians.

The employees of the Planning Commission, a government agency, are luckier. They can unburden their bowels in toilets that have been refurbished with a budget of 3 million rupees ($55,000). An additional 500,000 rupees ($9,000) has been spent in installing a security system that ensures only those with a “smart card” can enter.

from India Insight:

Human waste corroding Indian railway network

Human faeces is scattered across India’s 64,400 kilometres of rail lines.

One of the world’s largest surface transport networks, carrying 30 million people and 2.8 tonnes of goods daily, is being downed by those using it.

A government panel report this month said that human waste from open-discharge toilets used by passengers is damaging tracks and associated infrastructure.

from India Insight:

Indian women hard-pressed to relieve themselves

For an Indian man, the entire country is one easy-access urinal. Be it mustard fields, the national highway or the Himalayan foothills -- unzipping, unleashing and relieving comes naturally to them. Indian women, unfortunately, do not enjoy the same privilege. For them, infinite patience is a survival skill and a big bladder a necessity.

Bollywood actor Shah Rukh Khan seems to empathise with the pain of the Indian woman. He wants to “dedicate” his life to building public utilities for women across India. "I want dignity and respect to be brought to women," he said at an event in Mumbai.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Eugene, please have a seat…

Say, Blog Guy, I've been wondering about that guy who's sort of a living legend in your blog. You know who I mean.

Of course. You're talking about none other than Eugene "Toilethead" Johnson.

Is it true that there is only the one photo of him, and after that he just vanished?

from Oddly Enough Blog:

This restroom ain’t for resting, pal…

Blog Guy, last year you wrote about a business that was putting timers in their toilets, so that the lights would turn off after 10 minutes, even if the employees weren't finished.

I wondered if anybody else is experimenting with ways to get people to spend less time in the bathroom?

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Can I borrow your toothbrush for my feet?

Great news. We have another one of those serious etiquette columns that appear to be aimed at folks who were raised by neanderthals. Early neanderthals, not the more evolved ones.

This particular column tells you how to behave if you are a house guest. If you still need to be told this stuff, then good luck ever getting invited anyplace.

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