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from Breakingviews:

Review: An American-Chinese morality tale

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The subtitle of Stephen Roach's new book has an arresting image. "Unbalanced: the Codependency of America and China" describes two economies with mutually reinforcing dysfunctions. This approach is sometimes helpful, but the book's strongest argument concerns the retired Morgan Stanley economist's homeland. He makes a persuasive case that "most of America's deep-seated economic problems...are of its own making."

Roach, who is now teaching at Yale, is well aware that his model does not describe all the differences between the two countries. China is growing fast from wretched poverty while the United States still enjoys one of the highest standards of living in the world. The political and social positions are quite different. Meanwhile, China and America's geopolitical concerns are more hostile than dependent.

The unhealthy mutual support system is found in consumption, production, trade and finance. American consumers depend too much on cheap Chinese imports. The U.S. financial system depends too much on the dollars that China collects from the excess of its exports over imports. On the other side, China depends on American consumers to buy its goods and help develop its industrial production.

from Expert Zone:

How to get India on the highway to high growth

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

The president's address to parliament this week lays out the new government’s roadmap to get India’s economy back to high growth. That will take time and is not easy either.

True, the BJP government led by Narendra Modi inherited a weak economy - growth was a mere 4.7 percent; industry was static; there was no employment generation; and inflation was at over 8 percent. The only comfort was that foreign exchange reserves exceeded $312 billion.

from Breakingviews:

Abe’s small hits weightier than big trade miss

By Andy Mukherjee 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Shinzo Abe’s big miss in prizing open Japan’s farm economy is making investors needlessly glum. The prime minister’s smaller recent successes, from thawing out frozen land and labour markets to reining in healthcare costs, add up to a strong reform push.

from Expert Zone:

The reform club

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

That custodian of the English language, the Oxford English Dictionary, describes a bubble as “anything fragile, unsubstantial, empty or worthless; a deceptive show”. Could this description apply to the current frenzy for “reform” that is seemingly sweeping the global economy? The answer is “yes, in part”. While there are some genuine attempts at reform, market expectations for reform will inevitably be disappointed in some parts of the world.

The global financial crisis has prompted politicians to advocate economic reform in two ways. First, the crisis demonstrated that the status quo needed to be changed -- and in many cases that change required sizeable structural change. Second, as the structure of the world economy has changed (lower global capital flows, slower global trade, etc.) so economies have had to adapt the way that their economies are structured.

from Breakingviews:

Companies risk changing euro view at wrong time

By Swaha Pattanaik

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

A rising single currency has confounded and hurt European exporters. An increasing number are becoming euro bulls, but their conversion could be ill-timed. While the currency’s rally may not be over, the ECB seems too unhappy with euro strength for it to last past autumn.

from MacroScope:

Erdogan unfettered

Investors have spent months looking askance at Turkey’s corruption scandal and Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan’s response to it – purging the police and judiciary of people he believes are acolytes of his enemy, U.S.-based cleric Fethullah Gulen. But it appears to have made little difference to his electorate.

Erdogan declared victory after Sunday’s local elections and told his enemies they would now pay the price. His AK Party was well ahead overall but the opposition Republican People's Party (CHP) appeared close to seizing the capital Ankara. 

from MacroScope:

A question of energy

After two days in The Hague, Barack Obama moves on to Brussels for an EU/U.S. summit with Ukraine still casting the longest shadow.

Europe’s energy dependence on Russia is likely to top the agenda with the EU pressing for U.S. help in that regard while the standoff with Russia could give new impetus to talks over the world’s largest free trade deal.

from Breakingviews:

Rich world exports its way to trouble

By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Rich nations are exporting their way to trouble. For eight straight quarters, advanced economies have exported more goods and services than they have imported, suggesting that as a group they are free-riding on world demand, most of which has come from emerging markets. But this growth strategy is both selfish and self-defeating.

from MacroScope:

Obama twists, EU sticks

Washington has seriously upped the ante on Vladimir Putin by slapping sanctions on some of his most powerful allies.

Now on the U.S. blacklist are Kremlin banker Yuri Kovalchuk and his Bank Rossiya, major oil and commodities trader Gennady Timchenko and the brothers Arkady and Boris Rotenberg, linked to big contracts on gas pipelines and at the Sochi Olympics, as well as Putin's chief of staff and his deputy, the head of military intelligence and a railways chief. Most have deep ties with Putin and have grown rich during his time in power.

from MacroScope:

Odds on Britain leaving EU shift again

Kiev has appealed for Western help to stop Moscow annexing Crimea, where a referendum on joining Russia will be held on Sunday. Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseny Yatseniuk will take that message to Washington and the United Nations.

The West says the referendum is illegal. U.S. lawmakers are preparing sanctions against Russia and European Union leaders could impose penalties, such as bans on visas for key Russian officials, as early as Monday if Vladimir Putin does not come to the negotiating table. There is no sign that he will and there is no question of western force being deployed.

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