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from Photographers' Blog:

Riding the Moscow metro

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Moscow, Russia

By Lucy Nicholson

London has the world’s oldest underground rail system; Tokyo’s metro has employees to push people into packed trains; New York’s subway is an ethnic melting pot. Hidden beneath the streets of Moscow is something completely different. To step onto the Moscow metro is to step back in time and immerse yourself in a museum rich in architecture and history.

Opened in 1935, it is an extravagant gallery of Communist design, full of Soviet artworks, Art Deco styling, statues, chandeliers, marble columns and ceiling mosaics.

GALLERY: INSIDE THE METRO

Built under Stalin by some of the best Soviet artists and architects, the metro transports 7-9 million people a day, more than London and New York combined. It costs 30 Rubles, around $1, for a single ride. We were given metro passes with our credentials when we arrived to cover the IAAF World Athletics Championships in Moscow. On the first day, I caught the metro back to our hotel with a group of Reuters photographers, when we missed the last media bus.

We were wowed by the architecture, and continued to travel this way to photograph it, and the people riding it: couples kissing, drunks taking late trains home, average commuters doing their best to avoid eye contact.

from Photographers' Blog:

Kiev’s workout paradise

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Kiev, Ukraine

By Gleb Garanich

Let me introduce you to the famous open-air “Sweat Gym” composed of around 200 work-out machines assembled from scrap iron to train all muscles. It is laid out on an island in the Dnieper river off Kiev.

I am not a sports fan, only learning about this place by accident. I thought it could make an interesting story and so I went to take pictures of the “Sweat Gym”. I was so struck by the uncanny scene that unfolded in front of me, that for the first half an hour I slowly roamed and looked around as if examining rare exhibits in a museum. Unknown gear, machines, intricate contraptions, old chains, wheels and tires, parts of caterpillar tracks and simple chunks of rusty metal – with humans swarming amid it all.

from Photographers' Blog:

Stopover in Mexico: The train to dreams

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By Edgard Garrido

What really happens when a man, or a woman, or even a child, abandons their home motivated by the idea of a better life? How do they imagine it? What do they wish for, what are they missing?

There is violence, overcrowded neighborhoods and gigantic infrastructure on the outskirts of Mexico City but there are also hundreds of thousands of people who walk day and night; different people every day and every night for weeks and months next to the train tracks, trying to jump on a train car filled with merchandise as the train passes. Fear is engraved in their faces and makes their feet heavy. Solitude, hunger, the cold and above all a painful uncertainty, are carried with them. They left behind their homes in a land without miracles and few joys, like the last of the deserts.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

This train is bound for glory, this train

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Whoa! Did you see that, Clancy? Looked like Pope Benedict on that train that just went by!

Nah, it couldn't have been, Lamar.That's an express and the Pope takes the local.

from George Chen:

A turning point for China?

By George Chen
The opinions expressed are the author’s own.

Is the train crash tragedy becoming a turning point for China's political and economic development?

Frustrations among the Chinese public have been growing rapidly -- at least on the internet if not yet in the streets. People are particularly unhappy with the way the Ministry of Railways has dealt with the train accident, which so far has cost 39 lives.

from George Chen:

Not just an accident

By George Chen
The opinions expressed are the author’s own.

We’ve talked about whether China's economy will have a soft or hard landing. In fact, what China needs is a pause. Lots of things in China may be moving way too fast. Including our trains.

On Saturday, at least 35 people died when a high-speed train smashed into a stalled train in eastern Zhejiang province, raising new questions about the safety of the fast-growing rail network. For a Reuters story, click here.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

A loco motive for doing this?

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Hey Doctor, it's me! Earl! I'm calling from out here on the railway line where you sent me. Are you positive this will make me better?

Yes Earl, we're on the right track.

You say the electrical energy from the rails will cure me, but how do I get it from the train into me?

from Your View:

The exodus for Eid Al-Adha

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People ride on a train roof to leave the city to celebrate Eid Al-Adha with their friends and families, near Dhaka, Bangladesh, November 2010. Your View/Saad Shahriar

from Your View:

The exodus for Eid Al-Adha

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People ride on a train roof to leave the city to celebrate Eid Al-Adha with their friends and families, near Dhaka, Bangladesh, November 2010. Your View/Saad Shahriar

from FaithWorld:

Amazing photo of Eid travellers in Bangladesh

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eid b'desh

An overcrowded train approaches as other passengers wait to board at a railway station in Dhaka, November 16, 2010. Millions of residents in Dhaka are travelling home from the Bangladeshi capital to celebrate the Eid al-Adha holiday on Wednesday. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha to mark the end of the haj by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command. Reuters photo by Andrew Biraj.

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