from MacroScope:

Shock now clearly trumps transparency in central bank policymaking

January 29, 2014

The days of guided monetary policy, telegraphed by central banks and priced in by markets in advance, are probably coming to an end if recent decisions around the world are any guide.

from India Insight:

Little public outrage as politicians unite against transparency

August 8, 2013

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

India's political parties are united, for a change. It's not over women's safety or how many poor people the country has. They have closed ranks against moves to make parties accountable under the Right to Information (RTI) law.

from The Great Debate:

Fed chair fight raises crucial questions for Obama

By Glenn Hubbard
August 4, 2013

The media circus over who will be the next chairman of the Federal Reserve is, on the one hand, an unwelcome spectacle at a time when uncertainty over the outlook for U.S. output and jobs growth is high. While previous leadership transitions have brought forth speculation about candidates, the current “contest” is odd. President Obama, after ungraciously commenting on Chairman Bernanke’s reappointment prospects, wisely stepped back for a period of reflection and decision about “what” he wants as well as “who” he wants.

from MacroScope:

St. Louis blues: Fed’s Bullard gets a sentence

August 1, 2013

Ellen Freilich contributed to this post

Talk about getting a word in edgewise. St. Louis Federal Reserve Bank President James Bullard got almost a full sentence in the central bank’s prized policy statement.

from MacroScope:

Loose lips sink ships? Fed’s latest transparency sows confusion, says Mizuho’s Ricchiuto

July 16, 2013

The complexity of non-traditional monetary policy is hard enough to explain to other economists and policymakers. Market participants prefer sound bites, opines Steven Ricchiuto, chief economist at Mizuho Securities USA in a note. As such, the more the Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke tries to explain the Federal Open Market Committee's position on tapering and policy accommodation the more he confuses the message, Ricchiuto says.

from The Great Debate:

A blueprint to make banks behave

By Jermyn Brooks
March 5, 2013

Banking integrity has become an oxymoron. Top bankers need to change this and take responsibility for tackling ethical issues. For this to happen, every part of the organization – from senior management to human resources managers to those on the trading floor and beyond – should be assessed according to the contribution it makes to promoting ethical values, not just the bottom line.

from David Rohde:

Obama’s legacy of secrecy

By David Rohde
February 8, 2013

John Brennan’s testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Thursday was a microcosm of the Obama administration’s approach to counterterrorism: The right assurances, with little transparency.

from The Great Debate:

Apple and Samsung’s cone of silence

By Nancy Scola
October 17, 2012

Apple and Samsung, you might have heard, have spent the last many months in a California courtroom haggling over who violated whose patents. At the end of August, Apple was awarded more than a billion dollars in damages by a jury, and the Samsung is now claiming jury misconduct. Just last week a U.S. appeals court threw out the judge’s ban on Samsung’s Galaxy Nexus phone. The whole situation is, really, turning into a bit of a confusing mess.

from The Human Impact:

Corruption in water sector increases hunger risk – experts

August 28, 2012

Stamping out corruption in the water sector is crucial to boosting global food production as world population growth increases pressure on water supplies, according to experts meeting at World Water Weekin Stockholm.

from The Great Debate:

The people’s business is none of our business

By Joshua Spivak
August 2, 2012

Politicians have always loved to keep the political process as shrouded in mystery as possible. But for a brief time, thanks to the increased use of computers, it seemed that technology would finally shine some needed sunlight on the political process. Due to the extensive virtual paper trails created by emails, and assisted by ever-improving search technology, what went on between government officials was opened up for public examination in new and unexpected ways.