from Breakingviews:

Attack in Nice keeps border issue front and centre

July 15, 2016

The tragic deaths of over 80 people celebrating Bastille Day in the southern French city of Nice will keep border issues front and centre. The truck driver who ploughed through a crowd in what French President Francois Hollande called a terrorist act held French and Tunisian dual nationality, according to news reports. But that won’t prevent intensified fears about Europe’s frontiers.

from The Great Debate:

Why killers’ families always seem to be the last to know

November 23, 2015

Updated Dec. 7, 2015

Weapons and other evidence are shown on a tarp near a SUV involved in the Wednesdays attack is shown in San Bernardino, California December 3, 2015. Authorities on Thursday were working to determine why a man and a woman opened fire at a holiday party of his co-workers in Southern California, killing 14 people and wounding 17 in an attack that appeared to have been planned. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni       TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY      - RTX1X3FC

Weapons and other evidence are shown on a tarp near an SUV involved in Wednesday's attack in San Bernardino, California, December 3, 2015. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

from MacroScope:

Tsipras’ High Noon

March 19, 2015


EU leaders gather for a two-day summit with Greece and Ukraine eclipsing the official economic and energy policy agenda.

from The Great Debate:

Why Arab Spring made life better in Tunisia, failed everywhere else

February 18, 2015

A Tunisian fan reacts after Tunisia lost their quarter-final soccer match of the 2015 African Cup of Nations against Equatorial Guinea in Bata

A Tunisian fan soccer fan. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh

Earlier this month, Tunisia's newly elected parliament cobbled together a coalition government led by a secular party that included its Islamist rivals, who had been democratically ousted from power. The new government, coming on the heels of a historic presidential election, a new constitution and the first democratic elections to be held during the Arab Spring, marks an astonishing democratic culmination in the birthplace of the movement. It has also proven hard to replicate.

from MacroScope:

Russia’s plight

December 22, 2014

Russia's President Putin chairs a meeting of the Security Council at the Russian defense control center in Moscow

Trying to predict the rouble’s path is a fool’s charter but it’s fairly safe to say it won’t return to a level that will take pressure off the Russian economy. It has opened 2 percent higher versus the dollar in Moscow this morning, mirroring a rise in oil from $60 a barrel.

from Global Investing:

The Sub-Saharan frontier: future generations

June 3, 2013

As growth in Sub-Saharan Africa is set to post a steady 5-6 percent per annum to 2017 according to IMF estimates,  investors will be taking notes on the region's growth story not least with the financial sector.

from The Great Debate:

Mideast’s dynamic opportunity for peace

November 21, 2012

The Arab world may be in turmoil, but its leaders actually need an enduring peace—now in Gaza and long-term with Israel—because regimes across the region are vulnerable as never before.

from John Lloyd:

Getting away from the ‘Arab Street’

November 19, 2012

The Tunisian Foreign Minister, Rafik Abdesslem, visited Gaza last week to give a speech. Abdesslem, who spent many years in exile studying international relations at the University of Westminster in London, is an intellectual with little adult experience of the rougher side of the Middle East.

from The Human Impact:

Tunisian constitution must enshrine equal status of women, says activist

September 19, 2012


Tunisian human rights activist Amira Yahyaoui recalls how, at the age of 17, she narrowly missed being shoved under a subway train. This is just one example of the threats and pressures her family faced for their opposition to the country’s then president Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali, who was ousted last year in a popular uprising.

from Anya Schiffrin:

Tunisia’s Arab Spring turns to anxious summer

July 6, 2012

We visited  Tunisia last week, during a scorching heat wave. The women we met were wearing sleeveless summer dresses, but a couple of them said that when they go out, their neighbors now tell them off for wearing revealing clothes. With the religious Nahda party now in power, uncovered women worry that their daughters won’t be able to wear bikinis and wonder which countries their daughters can move to if things get worse.