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from Unstructured Finance:

Obama hearts El-Erian

By Sam Forgione and Matthew Goldstein

OK, so it's not a big gig like being nominated to head the Treasury Dept. But President Obama's decision to tap PIMCO's Mohamed El-Erian to head the President's Global Development Council is no insignificant matter.

As the co-chief investment officer of the giant bond shop founded by Bill Gross, El-Erian is seen as the eventual heir apparent to run the Newport Beach, Calif firm. And El-Erian increasingly has become one of PIMCO's most visible faces---maybe even more than Gross himself these days--when it comes to talking about what ails the U.S. and global economies.

The assignment is another indication of PIMCO's growing ties to the Washington establishment, something that has developed as the firm has grown to manage $1.92trillion in assets and played a starring role along with BlackRock in helping to manage some of the financial crisis rescue programs. (For more see the Special Report that Jenn Ablan led earlier this year on Gross and his empire, Twilight of the Bond King).

The job, in which El-Erian will serve as chairman, also is one more example of Obama's outreach to the financial and business communities in the wake of his re-election. In the wake of his victory, Obama seems to be going out of his way to dispel the views that he pays no heed to what Wall Street or the business community  thinks.

from Unstructured Finance:

UF Weekend reads – The PIMCO edition

Jenn Ablan likes to tell me that people are always writing about PIMCO and Bill Gross, the long reigning "king of bonds." And when you think of it there's a lot of truth to that assertion.

Gross' mammoth $263 billion Total Return Fund gets endless coverage because--by its very size--it really is the bond market. It's one reason why so much ink is spilled whenever the Total Return Fund has a month where investors pull more money out of the fund than put in.  And it's why there's so much analysis of what Gross & Co. are doing with Treasuries and mortgage-backed securities--and whether they are using lots of leverage and derivatives to boost exposures.

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