Archive

Reuters blog archive

from Breakingviews:

PayPal forced to rev after eBay’s belated U-turn

By Rob Cyran

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

PayPal is compelled to accelerate after eBay’s belated U-turn. The $70 billion online auction company has for years resisted setting free its payments business, most recently digging in its heels against Carl Icahn’s demands to do so. Apple and Alibaba have created more urgency than investors, or Breakingviews, could. EBay squandered a big early advantage, but a spun-off PayPal may have a chance to play catch-up.

Being owned by eBay proved valuable early on for PayPal. The innovative internet flea market provided a steady flow of new customers, cash and logistical support to help it grow. PayPal regularly increased total payments at a 25 percent compound rate.

The warm embrace, however, eventually started to smother. More than 70 percent of PayPal’s payments now come from outside eBay, but the ownership structure prevented close partnerships with the likes of Amazon. At the same time, app developers and customers have grown frustrated with PayPal’s software, customer service and sluggish adaptation to new technology. Departed co-founder Elon Musk warned two years ago that the plan he wrote at the turn of the century was essentially still in place and that if PayPal didn’t act quickly it would be “screwed.”

from MacroScope:

Euro falling but no impact on inflation yet

Lithuanian 1 euro coins are pictured in the Lithuanian Mint in Vilnius

Euro zone inflation figures are due and after Germany’s rate held steady at 0.8 percent the figure for the currency bloc as a whole could marginally exceed forecasts and hold at 0.4 percent.

One upside for the currency bloc is the falling euro which has broken below its 2013 lows and is down almost nine percent from the peak it hit against the dollar in May. With U.S. money printing about to end next month and speculation intensifying about the timing of a first interest rate rise from Washington, there are good reasons to think that this trend could continue.

from Breakingviews:

Commodity bear market looks entrenched

By Swaha Pattanaik

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

The commodities bear market looks entrenched. Strong supply-side responses, or successful economic stimulus by the European Central Bank, would be required to reverse price falls. Neither looks terribly likely.

from MacroScope:

After “get in the hole!”, Europe remains in a hole

Team Europe golfers pour champagne over captain Paul McGinley as they celebrate retaining the Ryder Cup at Gleneagles

Who says Europe is broken? The Ryder Cup stays here again and even Nigel Farage, leader of Britain’s anti-EU party, said he wanted Europe’s golfers to win.

The euro zone is not winning the economic competition however, despite the European Central Bank’s best efforts (it should be noted that only 3 of the 12 Ryder Cup team come from euro zone countries).

from Breakingviews:

Bill Gross and Janus Capital made for each other

By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

The old saw about past performance not necessarily being indicative of future results just found a new poster child: bond king Bill Gross sitting on his Janus Capital throne.

from Breakingviews:

Apple CEO Tim Cook gets $25 billion warning shot

By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Shareholders have given Apple boss Tim Cook about 25 billion reasons to worry. That’s how many dollars they have wiped off the company’s stock-market value in the past two days after a botched system update and reports its new iPhones can be bent. It’s a small hit for a $600-billion-odd company. But the 2012 Apple Maps fiasco is a reminder that one-off snafus can presage prolonged pain.

from Breakingviews:

Sam Waksal’s new biotech tests Wall Street amnesia

By Robert Cyran

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Sam Waksal’s new biotech tests Wall Street’s selective amnesia. The former ImClone boss who went to prison for an insider trading scandal that also ensnared Martha Stewart said on Wednesday that he plans to take his latest venture, Kadmon, public this year. He follows second-chancers like Donald Trump and Long-Term Capital Management founder John Meriwether. Investors can be astonishingly forgiving.

from Breakingviews:

Wall Street needs sheriff more than toll collector

By Reynolds Holding

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Wall Street needs a sheriff more than a glorified toll collector. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder is stepping down after squeezing multibillion-dollar penalties from the likes of JPMorgan and Bank of America. He had less success securing convictions, though, making law enforcement just an expensive cost of doing business. Next financial crisis, Uncle Sam should send in a tougher cop.

from MacroScope:

Britain back on board for action in Iraq

An Iraqi SWAT trooper covers his ears as he fires a mortar bomb during clashes with Islamic State militants, north of Muqdadiyah

U.S. air strikes in Syria continued overnight with a monitoring group saying at least 14 Islamic State fighters were killed.

Having sat out so far, Britain said it would join strikes against militants but only in Iraq for now – which has asked for such help – not Syria. IS holds swathes of land in both countries.

from Breakingviews:

Uncle Sam gets wires crossed on data privacy

By Reynolds Holding

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Uncle Sam has gotten his wires crossed on internet data privacy. A hacker went to prison for exposing private customer information that AT&T failed to protect from online access. Now U.S. prosecutors are defending their right to do essentially the same thing in the Silk Road drug-website case. Anti-hacking laws are tough to take seriously when even enforcers can’t decide what’s allowed.

  •