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Reuters blog archive

from MacroScope:

Moment of truth for EU sanctions

The logo of Russia's top crude producer Rosneft is seen in Moscow

President Barack Obama and the leaders of Germany, Britain, France and Italy agreed on a conference call last night to impose wider sanctions on Russia’s financial, defence and energy sectors.

EU ambassadors are meeting today and are expected to target state-owned Russian banks and their ability to finance Moscow's faltering economy.

European Council President Herman Van Rompuy has written to EU leaders asking them to authorise their envoys to complete an agreement by the end of today. That would avoid the need for leaders to hold a special summit to approve the sanctions.

Under a blueprint produced last week, European investors would be banned from buying new debt or shares of banks owned 50 percent or more by the state.

from Stories I’d like to see:

The Russian sanctions information gap

Emergencies Ministry member walks at the site of a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 plane crash near the settlement of Grabovo in the Donetsk region

There are so many gaps in the reporting about the effort to use economic sanctions against Russia to get President Vladimir Putin to pull back support for the Ukraine separatists that it makes sense to devote my whole column this week to listing them.

Of course, it’s a lot easier to identify the gaps than to do the reporting to fill them. Still, many are so obvious that it suggests that for all the resources spent on getting great video of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crash site, interviews with the victims’ families and reports from the war front in eastern Ukraine -- all important stories -- there is more heat than light being produced when it comes to the most critical, long-term question related to the Ukrainian conflict: If economic sanctions are the global economy’s modern substitute for using military force in repelling aggression, how is that playing out in the first test of that strategy against a global economic player like Russia?

from Breakingviews:

Discounters’ $20 bln deal may spark M&A price war

By Kevin Allison

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Discount retailer Dollar Tree’s $8.5 billion pounce on rival Family Dollar could spark an M&A price war. The companies have identified more than enough cost savings in their $20 billion union to cover the 23 percent premium to be paid to Carl Icahn and other Family Dollar investors. As a percentage of revenue, though, synergies are relatively low. That may leave room for sector giant Dollar General to lob in a bid.

from Breakingviews:

Memo to Wall Street: more Ace Greenberg please

By Antony Currie

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Wall Street needs more leaders like Alan “Ace” Greenberg. The onetime Bear Stearns boss, famed for his pithy missives to staff, died on Friday. He was 86. Though he was no longer in charge, the firm’s 2008 collapse is a notable blemish on an otherwise illustrious career. The industry could use more of Greenberg’s scrappy PSD: poor, smart and driven.

from Breakingviews:

Sky Europe transforms BSkyB investment case

By Quentin Webb

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

“British” Sky Broadcasting is no more. The group is buying sister Sky units in Germany and Italy for at least 4.9 billion pounds ($8.3 billion) in cash from Rupert Murdoch’s Twenty-First Century Fox. That transforms the investment case for the UK’s top pay-television group.

from MacroScope:

EU slowly tightens screw

A coffin of one of the victims of Malaysia Airlines MH17 downed over rebel-held territory in eastern Ukraine, is carried from an aircraft during a national reception ceremony at Eindhoven airport

The EU is slowly tightening the screw on Russia, with senior officials proposing yesterday to target state-owned Russian banks in its most serious sanctions so far. Ambassadorial talks on how precisely that is to be done continue today and the measures are likely to be enacted next week.

One key proposal is that European investors would be banned from buying new debt or shares of banks owned 50 percent or more by the state. These banks raised almost half of their 15.8 billion euro capital needs in EU markets last year. That is a big deal and there are increasing signs of investors turning their back on Russia lock, stock and barrel. However, with its giant FX reserves, the central bank can provide dollars to fund external debt for a considerable period of time.

from Breakingviews:

Murdoch calls on European outposts for Time Warner

By Quentin Webb

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Rupert Murdoch is calling on European outposts to help in his pursuit of Time Warner. The media mogul’s Twenty-First Century Fox is poised to sell its Sky pay-TV arms in Italy and Germany to Fox’s UK affiliate British Sky Broadcasting. There’s strategic logic to the asset shuffle and the proceeds could help sweeten his $80 billion bid for the owner of CNN and Warner Bros. How Murdoch treats non-Murdoch owners is the linchpin.

from Breakingviews:

Allergan bosses put money where their mouths are

By Robert Cyran

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Allergan bosses have put money where their mouths are. The drugmaker says it is worth more on its own than the $52 billion hostile suitor Valeant Pharmaceuticals International is offering. That’s straight from the empty-promise, takeover-defense playbook. Allergan, however, is linking stock and option grants to lofty profit goals. It’s a bolder gambit that should become an M&A norm.

from Photographers' Blog:

Kandahar to Idaho: a life in recovery

Pocatello, Idaho
By Jim Urquhart

It’s been just over two years since Sgt. Matt Krumwiede’s life was changed forever by an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan. Until last month, it had been even longer since he had last set foot in his home in Pocatello, Idaho.

On Sunday, June 29, Matt came home for a short visit for the first time since a homemade bomb tore away both his legs while he was on patrol in Kandahar.

from Breakingviews:

“New Deutsche” just got pushed back again

By Dominic Elliott

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Raising $12 billion last month now looks like the easy part of Deutsche Bank’s renewal. The German lender is, it emerges, under fire from United States regulators for a raft of procedural failings. Deutsche may have repaired its capital position and revamped its strategy this year. But persuading investors the bank holds itself to higher standards than before the crisis is starting to look like a generation’s work.

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