from Breakingviews:

Yum Brands China split short on crispy goodness

May 6, 2015

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions here are his own. 

from Breakingviews:

Review: Hank Paulson’s kiss-and-don’t-tell China guide

May 1, 2015

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

Abe’s Capitol Hill speech needs ideas for backyard

April 29, 2015

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from MacroScope:

Riksbank’s policy dilemma

By Mike Peacock
April 29, 2015

Riksbank Governor Stefan Ingves attends a forum organized by Mexico's Central Bank in Mexico City

Sweden’s central bank delivers its latest policy decision with many analysts expecting a further interest rate cut and an expansion of its new bond-buying programme, reflecting its fear of deflation despite solid economic growth.

from MacroScope:

Data isn’t as objective as the Fed might have you believe

April 28, 2015

SFFedTshirt.jpgFed officials say they will be “data-dependent” when it comes to making monetary policy. San Francisco Fed President John Williams feels so strongly about it, he’s even printed up a T-shirt to get that message across. But truth be told, data-dependency is not as objective as it sounds. Data doesn’t dictate policy; it’s the interpretation of data that’s key. What is rate-hike-worthy data to one policymaker is keep-the-pedal-to-the-metal data for another. Take, for instance, U.S. GDP growth. Richmond Fed President Jeffrey Lacker says he expects GDP growth to average 2 percent to 2.5 percent this year, a pace that would justify a Fed rate hike in June. Chicago Fed President Charles Evans expects 3 percent growth this year, and does not believe even that would justify a rate hike until the first half of 2016. So what does it tell you about monetary policy if you see GDP growth of 2.5 percent? Not a whole lot, judging from these two. And the statements of other Fed officials are hardly more helpful. Indeed, as Atlanta Fed President Dennis Lockhart said recently, “I don't think it is advisable to approach such a decision with rigid quantitative triggers in mind.” Watch the data, sure. But don’t assume the data will tell you much about the exact timing of the rate hike. Monetary policy – it’s subjective. Maybe some policymaker will print that on a T-shirt.

from MacroScope:

Déjà vu? Fed may struggle to hike if U.S. optimism fades for H2

April 28, 2015

RTR4VVNE.jpgThe U.S. Federal Reserve may find it even more tough to raise interest rates as the year wears on if dwindling expectations for growth are any guide.

from Breakingviews:

China’s cyber crackdown: A guide for the perplexed

April 24, 2015

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

from Edward Hadas:

Hooray, trading slowed on Friday

By Edward Hadas
April 22, 2015

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

Teva’s $40 bln hostile bid puts hope over reality

April 21, 2015

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

from Breakingviews:

Review: Some of what is wrong with economics

By Edward Chancellor
April 17, 2015

The response of the dismal scientists to their collective failure to anticipate the global financial crisis has been dispiriting. Economists have refused to set aside their abstruse models, even though these models failed to predict the economic catastrophe. During the boom years, almost all economists applauded Alan Greenspan’s easy money policy. After the bust, the same people continue to deny – in the face of common sense - that the low interest rates of Greenspan’s Federal Reserve were largely responsible for the debt bubble. In short, economics has failed to address its intellectual weaknesses.